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Old 2017-04-27, 21:37   #1
VictordeHolland
 
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"Victor de Hollander"
Aug 2011
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Default Intel Xeon naming scheme change

Leaked info:
The new Intel Skylake Xeons will come with a change in naming scheme.

We used to have:
Xeon E5-1600 v(1-4) series for single socket
Xeon E5-2600 v(1-4) series for dual socket
Xeon E5-4600 v(1-4) series for 4 sockets
Xeon E7-4800 v? series for businesses with deep pockets
Xeon E7-8800 v? series for world domination
etc.

With the first digit indicating the amount of sockets it supported and the last two digits indicating the performance in that serie and the number after the v the version/iteration.
For instance the Intel Xeon E5-2620 (v1) was a SandyBridge based entry level model with 6 cores, while a new high-end E5-2699 v4 based on Broadwell has 22 cores.

The new Xeons will have a naming scheme with Bronze-Silver-Gold-Platinum indicating their performance/cores/multi socket abilities??

Name - Series - Cores
Xeon Platinum 8000 series: 22–28
Xeon Gold 5000/6000 series: 14–22
Xeon Silver 4000 series: 10–12
Xeon Bronze 3000 series: <10

I actually quite liked the old system as you could see in a few seconds what platform you're dealing with and more or less what performance to expect. It did have it shortcomings as I always have to lookup the model on the Intel Ark page to know how many cores/cache/frequency they have. So the same model number, but a different iteration can have different performance. For instance a E5-2650 v1 has 8 cores, but the E5-2650 v4 has 12 cores.
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Old 2017-04-28, 02:54   #2
retina
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I'm sure it is just a marketing ploy. No one wants a bronze medal. Gotta have me the latest trendy platinum thing to show off to my friends and make me feel all superior and good about myself.
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Old 2017-04-28, 08:45   #3
0PolarBearsHere
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VictordeHolland View Post
Leaked info:

With the first digit indicating the amount of sockets it supported and the last two digits indicating the performance in that serie and the number after the v the version/iteration.
So there was actually logic to it then. I guess you learn something new every day.
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Old 2017-04-28, 12:09   #4
VictordeHolland
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
I'm sure it is just a marketing ploy. No one wants a bronze medal.
Unfortunately it is just that..
IT professionals will still pick the right processor for their budget/ needs. But now they'll need to explain/elaborate to their management why they picked gold/silver instead of platinum.
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Old 2017-04-28, 14:31   #5
fivemack
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This is really daft; Intel's previous naming scheme, with the last two digits being basically 'awesomeness within the generation' and the version number telling you which generation you were in, made a lot of sense - at any time you probably did want an E5-2650 of the current generation.

It might be inevitable if 'v6' is going to mean Kaby Lake on the desktop, because it's not clear 'Kaby Lake' is a meaningful thing in a server context; it's not at all obvious to me what the next multi-core-server after Skylake will be.

Also, the new numbering scheme for 'gold' overlaps with the original eight-core Magny Cours Opteron numbering.
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Old 2017-04-29, 06:48   #6
Madpoo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fivemack View Post
This is really daft; Intel's previous naming scheme, with the last two digits being basically 'awesomeness within the generation' and the version number telling you which generation you were in, made a lot of sense - at any time you probably did want an E5-2650 of the current generation.

It might be inevitable if 'v6' is going to mean Kaby Lake on the desktop, because it's not clear 'Kaby Lake' is a meaningful thing in a server context; it's not at all obvious to me what the next multi-core-server after Skylake will be.

Also, the new numbering scheme for 'gold' overlaps with the original eight-core Magny Cours Opteron numbering.
I could care less what Intel calls them... when I spec out a server I'm still going to pick the CPUs that match my needs. Generally 2-socket models for me (the E5-26xx series). Of course I try to get as many cores as my budget allows because I'm planning for future growth.

Truth be told I often stick to the HPE Proliant "smart buys" because they have the best price. But you can still get good high performance models that way.

It's been ages since I worked at a place where 4+ socket servers were an option. With the multi-core CPUs available, I've been able to "suffer" with a measly two chips. LOL

I did like the obvious schema of the 1600/2600/etc. naming, but ultimately it doesn't really matter.
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