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Old 2016-07-27, 02:08   #1
a1call
 
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Default A Different Kind of a Computer

Hi,
The point of this thread is not to propose a practical solution to any problems, but rather to start a discussion about Computing theories and principals.

* Compare doing calculations on a calculator or doing calculations using a slide rule. They are 2 very different approaches.

* Now It is reasonable to expect that there would be yet more possibilities than these approaches to performing calculations.

* Consider 2 LC circuits with adjustable frequencies whose output are combined and the peak current is measured. The frequency of each LC circuit is precisely measured and is input to a computer along with the peak current data.

* The first circuit is set to oscillate at exactly 19 Hz

* The second circuit is adjusted between 1 Hz to 4 Hz

* The computer can determine that 19 is prime since a maximum stable peak only occurs at 1 Hz for all integer values of 1-4 Hz

* If the first circuit was set to resonate at 20 Hz, then the peak current values would be also present at exactly 2 Hz and 4 Hz as well as 1 Hz.

Last fiddled with by a1call on 2016-07-27 at 02:20
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Old 2016-07-27, 07:35   #2
xilman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a1call View Post
Hi,
The point of this thread is not to propose a practical solution to any problems, but rather to start a discussion about Computing theories and principals.

* Compare doing calculations on a calculator or doing calculations using a slide rule. They are 2 very different approaches.

* Now It is reasonable to expect that there would be yet more possibilities than these approaches to performing calculations.

* Consider 2 LC circuits with adjustable frequencies whose output are combined and the peak current is measured. The frequency of each LC circuit is precisely measured and is input to a computer along with the peak current data.

* The first circuit is set to oscillate at exactly 19 Hz

* The second circuit is adjusted between 1 Hz to 4 Hz

* The computer can determine that 19 is prime since a maximum stable peak only occurs at 1 Hz for all integer values of 1-4 Hz

* If the first circuit was set to resonate at 20 Hz, then the peak current values would be also present at exactly 2 Hz and 4 Hz as well as 1 Hz.
What you suggest has close similarities with Shor's algorithm for factoring on a quantum computer.
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Old 2017-06-25, 02:33   #3
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lehmer_sieve
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Old 2017-06-29, 11:15   #4
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These guys ported Msieve to use a neural coprocessor. This won best paper at a huge IEEE conference.

Last fiddled with by jasonp on 2017-06-29 at 11:16
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