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Old 2019-08-15, 08:37   #12
retina
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So the local propaganda machine TV is still the king of the house. Don't people have real lives any more?

https://phys.org/news/2019-08-famili...tentially.html
Quote:
TV companies battling to preserve the shared experience of scheduled TV viewing in an era of 24/7 streaming and personalised viewing need more than binge-watching contracts and no-sleeping agreements to keep customers.
And not only that, they want to watch you while you watch the brainwashing entertainment.
Quote:
... there is the potential to use technologies such as Alexa to identify areas of value destruction and to intervene ...
Gotta keep everyone happy and suitably controlled, we wouldn't want people to begin to think for themselves.

[/paranoid conspiracy message]
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Old 2019-08-15, 11:16   #13
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With broadcast TV, you can get rid of (most of) the ads on current shows if you record the program and watch it later. Then you can fast-forward through ("blip") the commercial breaks.

I say "most of" because, some years ago, they started plastering ads right over the programming, and these ads now take up at least a quarter of the screen. This practice is what led me, years ago, to quit watching most new programs. Alas, they even do something similar on PBS programs -- every 30 seconds or so, a PBS logo appears and stays on the screen for 10 minutes, followed by a logo reminding you what program you're watching, which stays on the screen for another 10 minutes.

There are syndicated reruns which are not plastered over, but they are generally butchered remnants of the original shows. Back in the day, you see, commercial interruptions took up around 10 minutes of each hour of air time. Now, it's more like 20. So, in order to fit an old hour-long program into an hour of air time, they have to chop out 10 minutes of the show. (My dad once suggested they could simply edit out every other frame to make more room for commercials. I'm glad he didn't live to see how close his idea has come to fruition. I've seen shows where the actors seem to be speaking a whole lot faster than they did when I saw the show many years ago. However, in practice, they generally chop out contiguous bits here and there, so whole sections of dialog from the original show are missing.) The increasing proportion of broadcast time taken up by advertising also helps explain the phenomenon of remakes of made-for-TV movies. Due to the greater amount of ad time, you see, the original movie no longer fits into the broadcast time originally allotted.

Another modern innovation is the cobbling together of scenes from previous installments of a (science or documentary) series, and presenting the result as a "new" program. I call these "slice and dice" episodes. They remind me of an incident in The Liberation of One, in which officials, the author among them, were arguing over some proposal. The latest version had been roundly panned at a meeting -- as had a number of preceding versions, and they were afraid the matter was going to drag on for a long time. The author recounted what he did after the meeting broke up: He told the secretary to rearrange the paragraphs, and type up clean copies for the next meeting. At the next meeting, everyone thought the new proposal was great!

The day may be coming when TV programming consists entirely of advertising, and then the problem will be solved. However, even advertising is cannibalizing the past. Once upon a nevermore, commercials often had these things called "jingles," original music composed specifically for those ads. People were literally singing the praises of the advertised product. And some of the music was actually pretty good. Nowadays, jingles are a rarity. They have largely been replaced by (bastardized versions of) old popular songs. I guess that signifies, in addition to the laziness of ad writers, the expiration of copyrights. It might also indicate that the ads are targeting people who are old enough to remember when the tunes were popular.

EDIT: As with commercial jingles, so it has been with TV program "theme music." All too many programs use (some rendition of) popular songs instead of having original theme music of their own.

Last fiddled with by Dr Sardonicus on 2019-08-15 at 11:31 Reason: Omit unnecessary words, clarify, nignif posty, and as indicated
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Old 2019-08-15, 12:57   #14
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Originally Posted by retina View Post
Firstly: Not all content is equal in value. Some is cheap rubbish like children's cartoons and some is expensive big-budget movies costing 10's of millions for two hours.
...
How appealing a product is to someone is a heap of variables as is how much it's worth to them to consume it. There is a somewhat dystopian future on the horizon in which products and pricing are tailored to the individual, it exists in many areas but going digital allows media to take it to an extreme. Dystopian because the level of surveillance required to accurately model an individual is high and you can bet it doesn't stop at predicting if you'll be in the mood to watch Cheers next week.

My solution to properly recompense creators I enjoy is to seek out direct means rather than normal channels when possible. Small but savvy enough creators have donations, subscription models, merchandise and the like; IMO cut out middlemen when you can they are not adding value. If you really want to line Disney's pocket then buy a blu-ray, use streaming services if you like but you are paying in large part with your data going that route. Once you are content that you've paid what you determine is a fair price for some media, consume it however you wish.

The next question is how much will someone pay me to watch Fast and Furious?
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Old 2019-08-15, 18:03   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
With broadcast TV, you can get rid of (most of) the ads on current shows if you record the program and watch it later. Then you can fast-forward through ("blip") the commercial breaks.
That is a lot of extra manual effort to go through to bother with recording and scheduling time later for watching. Plus maintaining the recording device and allocating mental bandwidth to avoid the FOMO phenomenon.
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The next question is how much will someone pay me to watch Fast and Furious?
Even if you don't watch it (since no one will pay you to) you will still pay for it when you buy whatever products are advertised within the show.

When I see the cost of the soda drinks I'm sure 90% of that price must be going into the pockets of advertising execs.
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Old 2019-08-15, 19:08   #16
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Even if you don't watch it (since no one will pay you to) you will still pay for it when you buy whatever products are advertised within the show.

When I see the cost of the soda drinks I'm sure 90% of that price must be going into the pockets of advertising execs.
It's common to think you're immune to advertising, but for the most part I actually am (helped in large part by not being the target demographic for 95% of things that are traditionally advertised and blocking tracking scripts that tailor online ads). I'm affected by advertising in a broad sense (food ads may make me hungry etc) but make a conscious effort to analyse and push against traditional ads and product placement.

The exception to the rule for me is video games, I can get won over into buying a game by watching many hours of someone I follow playing it if it's good enough. It's not advertising as such (the video creator may be paid via adsense, subscribers, unrelated sponsorship and/or merchandise but the creator of the game hasn't paid them to play it), but arguably it's a grey area. It's most similar to a (very long) review of a film say but it's also not like that in that the viewer may be the one doing most of the criticism rather than the video creator. Either way enjoy your annual £20 game industry I hope you don't spend it all at once.

Okay two exceptions, the sheer volume of posts on reddit about game of thrones did eventually wear me down into reading and watching them, not FOMO but more for context as it became annoying to browse reddit otherwise. Advertising by word of mouth can still get through it seems.
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Old 2019-08-16, 10:23   #17
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When I see the cost of the soda drinks I'm sure 90% of that price must be going into the pockets of advertising execs.
And they use HFCS instead of sugar to increase profits.


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Old 2019-08-18, 11:10   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
With broadcast TV, you can get rid of (most of) the ads on current shows if you record the program and watch it later. Then you can fast-forward through ("blip") the commercial breaks.
That is a lot of extra manual effort to go through to bother with recording and scheduling time later for watching. Plus maintaining the recording device and allocating mental bandwidth to avoid the FOMO phenomenon. Even if you don't watch it (since no one will pay you to) you will still pay for it when you buy whatever products are advertised within the show.
Depends how many programs you watch. Few programs, little manual effort or mental strain.

The amount of manual effort is surely in any case probably quite small compared to that required to grip handlebars and work the gears and brakes on a bicycle, especially when under attack by a squadron of Gymnorhina kamikaze.

If you buy products advertised on a program, I guess you're paying for that program whether or not you watch it.

Quote:
When I see the cost of the soda drinks I'm sure 90% of that price must be going into the pockets of advertising execs.
No argument there.
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Old 2019-08-18, 12:06   #19
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And they use HFCS instead of sugar to increase profits.


We saw this yesterday at Tractor Supply. (!)


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Old 2019-08-18, 12:36   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
The amount of manual effort is surely in any case probably quite small compared to that required to grip handlebars and work the gears and brakes on a bicycle, especially when under attack by a squadron of Gymnorhina kamikaze.
I'm too lazy to sit myself in front of a silly box and let my brain rot.

But I'll happily put my life at risk pumping the pedals for a few hours a day.

So that is "My solution for the problem of microtransactions and media in general", just ignore it and do something else.

Last fiddled with by retina on 2019-08-18 at 12:36
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Old 2019-08-18, 22:22   #21
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So that is "My solution for the problem of microtransactions and media in general", just ignore it and do something else.
I'll buy that!
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Old 2019-08-19, 14:59   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasong View Post
I believe the solution should be a combination of the Hulu and Amazon model. On Hulu, they offer everything free, but with commercials added so they can make money. With Amazon, you pay for videos, but except for Prime, it's an all-or-nothing proposition, you either buy the whole thing or you go without.
Both of these are misrepresented here:

On Hulu (unless they've changed their ways somewhat recently, I haven't bothered with it in a few years) much of it is free with ads, but certain content is only available with an overall Hulu subscription, which ...wait for it... still plays ads for you on all content.

On Amazon, a Prime account gives you access to a select few titles "included with Prime", while the vast remainder still must be purchased per item. I wouldn't call that "all-or-nothing".

edit: Also there are some other services that offer (heavily) ad-supported content like Crackle(one I've tried) and quite a few others. A quick google brought me to this listing of some others: https://www.intelivideo.com/blog/iv-...ming-services/

Last fiddled with by hansl on 2019-08-19 at 15:03
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