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Old 2005-09-14, 02:10   #1
crash893
 
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Default personal super computer

http://www.japancorp.net/Article.Asp?Art_ID=10850
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Old 2005-09-14, 03:54   #2
E_tron
 
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nice
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Old 2005-09-14, 08:01   #3
ixfd64
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Quote:
The new product sells for 12 million yen ($109,000) in a minimum configuration. Shipment is slated for February 2006. NEC is aiming to ship 300 systems over the next three years.
Blah!
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Old 2005-09-14, 08:03   #4
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Wouldn't it be better to buy a 2000 intel processor machine for the same cost?
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Old 2005-09-14, 10:27   #5
crash893
 
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where would you put it
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Old 2005-09-14, 10:41   #6
jinydu
 
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100 Pentium 4's would likely cost less and generate much more CPU power, but you would still have the problem of where to put all of them...

Last fiddled with by jinydu on 2005-09-14 at 10:42
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Old 2005-09-14, 12:41   #7
Peter Nelson
 
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Question Personal Supercomputers

Well, did you read the spec of that NEC machine? 16 Gigaflop.

Now they don't say whether this is rmax or rpeak but max is more usually quoted.

So, $109K for 16 GFlop well that's more than your PC.

Hmmmm,

Have you heard of Orion Multisystems?

Orion's DT-12 is a similarly compact low power cluster of 12 Efficeon processors. This delivers 13.8 max 36 Gigaflops peak performance and costs around $10000 (more performance at one tenth the cost).

If you DO want to spend $109K, you can have its big brother the DESKSIDE Orion DS-96 with 96 Efficeon processors (currently at 1.2GHz) for UNDER $100K. This can still be powered from a regular mains electricity supply but delivers 110.8 max/ 300 Glop peak performance (lots more than NEC) for less money.

However, if I had that money (about $70K upwards) I could get a 12 processor Cray XD1 chassis which uses Opterons (remember dualcore is now available for 24 cores) and an amazingly fast custom interconnect over Hypertransport which is much faster than Gigabit interconnect (or Infiniband, Myrinet et al). Also the chassis can support up to six FPGAs for custom hardware algorithms also connected directly onto the RapidArray fabric.

If populated with twelve 2.2 dualcore opterons, the XD1 delivers 106 Gflops peak performance. Remember, Opterons are fully 64-bit capable processors too.

Oh, and that's a CRAY supercomputer. And its expandable up to 144 opterons in a rack if you have more money.

There are other alternatives too.

SO, WHY WOULD I WANT TO BUY AN NEC AT THAT PRICE THAT DELIVERS LESS PERFORMANCE FOR MORE MONEY AND USES A PROPRIETARY PROCESSOR?

Also did NEC make a typo? 146GB hard drive space was once a lot, but now many of us have several times this on a desktop PC, or more using raid. Are they using a small 2.5" disk or something? If they had said 146 Terabyte I might be more interested! LOL.
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Old 2005-10-06, 18:31   #8
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How about this system:
http://www.mc.com/products/view/inde...64&type=boards

One of the features: "16 TFLOPS in a 6-foot rack"

Well, these are single precision TFLOPS. The achievable DP throughput will be 10% or even less..
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Old 2005-10-06, 22:04   #9
Knappo
 
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I don't think that such systems are worth begging for. Unless you have time-critical applications (re-entry of a shuttle :-) you can live with a system which is 30% slower but 70% cheaper...

So lets come back to reality :-)

I would be interested in you opinion:
How could you spend about 2000 € to gain the max. GIMPS output?
(just dreaming, tomorrow my next 10M LL is finished :-)

Would you buy about 20 used PCs with a Celeron 1,2 Ghz or 4 new ones with a Athlon64 or a Pentium IV? Any other way of thinking is (of course) also allowed ...

(I think because a LL counts more P90 years than equal P-1, LL-testing would be the goal)
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Old 2005-10-06, 22:17   #10
Mystwalker
 
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but AFAIK, the P3-Celeron doesn't sport SSE2, which should tremendously speed up testing.
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Old 2005-10-06, 22:27   #11
Knappo
 
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I think you are right, but SSE2 does not only speed up the calculations but also boosts the price for a used computer... :-) (The first processor with it was the PIV I think...) How much can you gain because of SSE2. Of course it is VERY usefull for the small figures we're using, but does it produce such a speedup that it outlevels the costs? Target is still, to get the most out of the 2000 Euros...
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