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Old 2009-06-13, 02:08   #1
Carl Fischbach
 
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Oct 2007

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Default A proof for the Twin Prime Conjecture

The equations below will generate all twin primes for
infinity and will show that the twin prime conjecture
is true.


1) 2*odd(C) -Q = prime A

2) (2^n)*odd(D) -Q = prime B


Prime A and prime B are twin prime pairs.


Q is a sequence of primes 3*5*7*11... which are all potential
factors of prime B which are less than int(prime B)^.5 .

2*odd(C) - (2^n)*odd(D) = -2 or +2

For prime A and Prime B to be twin prime pairs odd(C) and Q must
have no common factors and odd(D) and Q also must have no
common factors.


Examples of the twin prime equation.


2*7 -3 =11
16*1 -3 =13

4*5 -3=17
2*11 -3=19

4*11 -3*5 =29
2*23 -3*5 =31

8*7 -3*5 =41
2*29 -3*5 =43


note int(29)^.5 = 5


A simple statistical analysis will show that these equations will produce
twin primes for infinity. Since primes occur an infinite number of times
equation 1) or 2) will also be prime an infinte number of times. If
twin primes were to end, equation 1) and 2) would be prime and not
prime an infinite number of times as primes occur. For equations 1) or 2)
to be not prime for an infinite number of times, odd(c) and Q or
odd(D) and Q would have to have common factors an infinite number of
times which would be a statistical impossibility, given the probability that
prime A and prime B would both be prime. This statistical impossibility is
proof that twin primes occur for infinity.
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Old 2009-06-13, 02:47   #2
Mini-Geek
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"Tim Sorbera"
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San Antonio, TX USA

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Doesn't this belong in Misc Math? The rest of the renowned Dr. Carl Fischbach's threads are there.
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Old 2009-06-13, 03:55   #3
akruppa
 
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"Nancy"
Aug 2002
Alexandria

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Moved to Misc. Math.

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Old 2009-06-16, 21:19   #4
flouran
 
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Dec 2008

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl Fischbach View Post
The equations below will generate all twin primes for
infinity and will show that the twin prime conjecture
is true.


1) 2*odd(C) -Q = prime A

2) (2^n)*odd(D) -Q = prime B


Prime A and prime B are twin prime pairs.


Q is a sequence of primes 3*5*7*11... which are all potential
factors of prime B which are less than int(prime B)^.5 .

2*odd(C) - (2^n)*odd(D) = -2 or +2

For prime A and Prime B to be twin prime pairs odd(C) and Q must
have no common factors and odd(D) and Q also must have no
common factors.


Examples of the twin prime equation.


2*7 -3 =11
16*1 -3 =13

4*5 -3=17
2*11 -3=19

4*11 -3*5 =29
2*23 -3*5 =31

8*7 -3*5 =41
2*29 -3*5 =43


note int(29)^.5 = 5


A simple statistical analysis will show that these equations will produce
twin primes for infinity. Since primes occur an infinite number of times
equation 1) or 2) will also be prime an infinte number of times. If
twin primes were to end, equation 1) and 2) would be prime and not
prime an infinite number of times as primes occur. For equations 1) or 2)
to be not prime for an infinite number of times, odd(c) and Q or
odd(D) and Q would have to have common factors an infinite number of
times which would be a statistical impossibility, given the probability that
prime A and prime B would both be prime. This statistical impossibility is
proof that twin primes occur for infinity.
This sounds Fischy...
Honestly, just stop. Please.

Last fiddled with by flouran on 2009-06-16 at 22:07
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Old 2009-06-22, 13:21   #5
davieddy
 
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"Lucan"
Dec 2006
England

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Quote:
Originally Posted by flouran View Post
This sounds Fischy...
Honestly, just stop. Please.
Or "Florid"?
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Old 2009-06-22, 13:59   #6
flouran
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davieddy View Post
Or "Florid"?
Well, what Mr. Fischbach was saying was of the "crank" nature. Thus, his claims were fishy, and as a pun, I changed it to Fischy.

Florid wouldn't make sense....

Last fiddled with by ewmayer on 2009-06-22 at 16:37 Reason: Would "Pseudo-Mathematical Floundering" be appropriately fishy?
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Old 2009-06-24, 05:51   #7
davieddy
 
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"Lucan"
Dec 2006
England

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Quote:
Originally Posted by flouran View Post
Well, what Mr. Fischbach was saying was of the "crank" nature. Thus, his claims were fishy, and as a pun, I changed it to Fischy.

Florid wouldn't make sense....
Perhaps "Floury" would have been better.
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Old 2009-06-24, 05:52   #8
flouran
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davieddy View Post
Perhaps "Floury" would have been better.
Perhaps. Though I like Fischy better.
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