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Old 2009-06-12, 21:00   #1
Flatlander
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"Chris"
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Default Name That Element

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8093374.stm

Suggestions please. (With explanations, I might learn something. )


edit:

Specifically: "What would YOU name this element based on its properties?"

Last fiddled with by Flatlander on 2009-06-12 at 21:47
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Old 2009-06-12, 21:18   #2
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New elements are always named after a scientist. Examples... Einsteinium, Darmstadtium, Roentengium, Lawrencium, Rutherfordium, etc
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Old 2009-06-12, 21:23   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Primeinator View Post
New elements are always named after a scientist.
Or after a place (Darmstadtium, Americium, Californium, Berkelium) where much of the science was done.
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Old 2009-06-12, 21:29   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philmoore View Post
Or after a place (Darmstadtium, Americium, Californium, Berkelium) where much of the science was done.
True, sorry. In fact, one of my examples above was of a place. Batalov, if you original question was how they made these elements... it is high energy physics. Essentially, by accelerating atoms to enormous speeds on the order of 90% the speed of light, collisions create intense heat and energy. This heat is enough to cause nuclear fusion (like the sun fuses hydrogen into helium). However, the strong nuclear force is not enough to keep the atom from decaying and it is the weak nuclear force that is responsible for this decay (I believe). At least this is my understanding of the process.

Edit, anyone is free to correct me if I am mistaken on something.

Last fiddled with by Primeinator on 2009-06-12 at 21:29
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Old 2009-06-12, 21:32   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Primeinator View Post
New elements are always named after a scientist. Examples... Einsteinium, Darmstadtium, Roentengium, Lawrencium, Rutherfordium, etc
Plutonium, Technetium,...
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Old 2009-06-12, 21:37   #6
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I read that the new super-heavy element lasted "a few milliseconds".

I knew that transuranic elements had a shorter emilife (sp?) of microseconds.

Is anything changed since 1990?

Luigi
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Old 2009-06-12, 21:42   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ET_ View Post
I read that the new super-heavy element lasted "a few milliseconds".

I knew that transuranic elements had a shorter emilife (sp?) of microseconds.

Is anything changed since 1990?

Luigi
I believe this is due to the prediction that some elements (even as they get heavier) are more stable than others. Thus, they predict even some super-heavy elements will be stable. I read this sometime ago so I am not sure if it is still scientific opinion. If I remember correctly, the next stable element is predicted to be element 122.
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Old 2009-06-12, 22:40   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ET_ View Post
I read that the new super-heavy element lasted "a few milliseconds".

I knew that transuranic elements had a shorter emilife (sp?) of microseconds.
The half-life is very short for most all of them. The "stable" ones have a longer half-life, but nothing close to even a second. The more recent understanding of shells for the nucleus has informed the newer experiments. The choice of target and bullet are being made to try to get the ratio "just so".
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Old 2009-06-12, 23:34   #9
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The first atom of 112 (in 1996) lasted 1/3 msec.
114 is expected to have a half-life of a few secs.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...lement-112.htm

A good article about the "island of stability" is
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...-universe.html

Historically, synthesised elements have overwhelmingly been named after places or people.
"I think we will try to find somebody who makes some big contribution to the thinking of mankind and who has had cultural influence," says Hoffman.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...dic-table.html

I propose the name:-
UnbelievablyslowforIUPACtofinallyrecogniseitium
based on its most notable property.

International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)

Last fiddled with by plandon on 2009-06-12 at 23:38
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Old 2009-06-12, 23:56   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plandon View Post
I propose the name:-
UnbelievablyslowforIUPACtofinallyrecogniseitium
based on its most notable property.
From the article linked in the OP:
Quote:
...

But such experiments produce very few successful fusions, and scientists need increasingly powerful accelerators to run experiments for longer and find the elusive, unstable elements.

This is why it took such a long time for element 112 to be officially recognised by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

Its discovery had to be independently verified, and so far only four atoms have ever been observed.
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Old 2009-06-13, 00:39   #11
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Quote:
..., and so far only four atoms have ever been observed.
Which makes Quadratomium my favourite, at least currently.
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