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Old 2004-05-24, 22:17   #1
ixfd64
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"Danny"
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Default alright Fermat divisors, ya can run....

...but ya can't hide.

Seriously, though... Anyone notice the huge gap between the discovery of Fermat divisors? I mean, it's been almost 7 months since the last Fermat divisor was discovered. Is the project even running?

Well, on the bright side, a longer gap can sometimes mean a bigger surprise! :)

---
*makes funny face at next poster*
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Old 2004-05-25, 12:40   #2
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"Luigi"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ixfd64
...but ya can't hide.

Seriously, though... Anyone notice the huge gap between the discovery of Fermat divisors? I mean, it's been almost 7 months since the last Fermat divisor was discovered. Is the project even running?
The Project is up and running.

I received many updates from Fermat's factors searchers :-)

Luigi
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Old 2004-05-25, 17:14   #3
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Quite a few large Proth primes have been discovered in the past six months, but as luck would have it, none of them proved to be a Fermat number divisor. But sooner or later...
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Old 2004-05-26, 01:50   #4
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What is the smallest Fermat number whose primality status is unknown?
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Old 2004-05-26, 02:53   #5
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I believe it's F33.
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Old 2004-05-26, 05:51   #6
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It is, according to Wilfrid Keller's status page.
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Old 2004-05-26, 14:29   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akruppa
It is, according to Wilfrid Keller's status page.
And if anyone would know, it would be Alex. ;)
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Old 2004-05-27, 00:26   #8
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"Composite but no factor known m = 14, 20, 22, 24"

So there is a primality test for Fermat numbers that doesn't require finding a factor?
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Old 2004-05-27, 05:01   #9
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Well, there's Pepin's test, but the numbers quickly grow too large for it.
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Old 2004-05-27, 05:42   #10
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Hmm. F25 already has over 10.1M digits.

No wonder... Mersenne Numbers grow exponentially while Fermat Numbers grow "double exponentially".

Last fiddled with by jinydu on 2004-05-27 at 05:43
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