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Old 2020-08-11, 11:18   #56
xilman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckerkao View Post
Your version is [decimal] base 60, my version is [dozenal] base 50. Same total quantity, but different superbases.

I wish I can type in the Babylonian numerical symbols, but I cannot.
Given that you can type in cuneiform, why don't you use the standard representation which is much more widely understood than one which you appear to have invented for your own self-gratification?
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Old 2020-08-11, 12:32   #57
tuckerkao
 
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Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Can but won't.

I used an image purely to save typing. Here is the start of the table in cuneiform:

π’•π’–π’—π’˜π’™π’šπ’›π’œπ’
I still cannot type in (5 x 2) or higher numbers, where are the higher symbols?
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Old 2020-08-11, 12:46   #58
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Originally Posted by tuckerkao View Post
I still cannot type in (5 x 2) or higher numbers, where are the higher symbols?
π’Œ‹, also known as I+1230B CUNEIFORM SIGN U, is the one you want. Use it twice for twenty.
π’Œ(U+1230D CUNEIFORM SIGN U U U) is thirty.

It should be obvious now how to type the remaining numbers.
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Old 2020-08-11, 12:53   #59
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Originally Posted by xilman View Post
π’Œ‹, also known as I+1230B CUNEIFORM SIGN U, is the one you want. Use it twice for twenty.
π’Œ(U+1230D CUNEIFORM SIGN U U U) is thirty.

It should be obvious now how to type the remaining numbers.
So I need more than 1 character for some numerical symbols. What if I want to count up to a large number such as several trillions in that base?

The numerical symbols I use can stand up to quintillions and still not too long.
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Old 2020-08-11, 13:03   #60
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Thanks to whoever moved the thread!

I don't know why the OP considers base twelve to be "better" than base ten (decimal).

Decimal is handy because (most) people have ten fingers, although, as Tom Lehrer said in the introduction to his song New Math, "base eight is just like base ten -- if you're missing two fingers." Perhaps the OP is polydactyl.

There is also the acquired advantage of "Arabic numerals." The standard symbols 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 for the decimal digits has made decimal notation understandable to people around the world. (Using the smallest digits, with the same numerical values as in decimal, for smaller bases (such as binary) automatically gives standard notation for bases two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, and nine as well.)

The use of the metric system carries a similar advantage. This was one of the reasons the French promoted the system originally, though at the time, being at war with the rest of Europe, they were unable to secure the cooperation of other nations.

But there was a domestic problem in France the metric system was also meant to solve: Every locality had its own system of weights and measures. This made commerce very cumbersome. But simply mandating the use of the metric system didn't solve the problem. People adopted the metric system, but kept right on using their customary units.

Finally, the French enacted a law mandating the exclusive use of the metric system starting in 1837.

If everyone were to adopt their own numerical system with their own preferred notation, it would bring the the communication of much mathematical knowledge to a dead standstill. Perhaps this is the OP's agenda.

I will point out that the good ol' USA adopted a decimal money system from the get-go.

As to adopting the exclusive use of the metric system here in the good ol' USA, there is a problem which did not exist, or at least not to anything like the same degree, in 1837. It is the inertia inherent in the vast amount of "English system" hardware, tools, and infrastructure. Every nut and bolt whose diameter is given in inches and threading in threads per inch, every pipe, wire, conduit, and every machine whose specs are in English units and is still in service -- including the machines used to manufacture the parts -- is an impediment to abandoning the "English system" and so dispensing with the problem of "conversion."

One question I like to ask to indicate a practical advantage of the metric system over the "English system" is, "How many cubic inches are there in a pint?" [The answer is 28 and 7/8.]

Here in the good ol' USA, the glasses supplied to bars for the specific purpose of disguising the fact that "pints" are less than a (US) pint are called "falsies."

Consulting my compilation of various units, I find that an Imperial pint is 20 Imperial fluid ounces, and about 19.2 US fluid ounces.

Dispensing with the "obsolete" Fahrenheit temperature scale seems to me to be an easier task. Rather than "converting," I keep in mind some landmarks, here giving the Fahrenheit equivalents merely for ease of reference. Zero degrees Centigrade (32 F) is the freezing point of water. Twenty degrees Centigrade (68 F) is around "room temperature" or the temperature of a pleasantly warm Spring day. Thirty degrees Centigrade (86 F) is a warm summer day. Thirty-seven degrees Centigrade (98.6 F) is "normal body temperature," and a hot summer day (except to folks in the Southern plains where temperatures of forty-five Centigrade (113 F) and Southwest desert areas, where summer temperatures of fifty Centigrade (122 F) are not uncommon). Fifty-five Centigrade (131 F) is unlivable for humans. If the ambient temperature stays that high long enough, the heat alone will kill you.

But we've got bigger problems with numbers here in the good ol' USA. Zero isn't zero any more, as exemplified by "zero percent" financing. Paper products (like paper towels and TP) are apt to have insane statements of equality like "6 = 24" prominently displayed on the package.
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Old 2020-08-11, 13:22   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
I don't know why the OP considers base twelve to be "better" than base ten (decimal).

Dispensing with the "obsolete" Fahrenheit temperature scale seems to me to be an easier task. Rather than "converting," I keep in mind some landmarks, here giving the Fahrenheit equivalents merely for ease of reference. Zero degrees Centigrade (32 F) is the freezing point of water. Twenty degrees Centigrade (68 F) is around "room temperature" or the temperature of a pleasantly warm Spring day. Thirty degrees Centigrade (86 F) is a warm summer day. Thirty-seven degrees Centigrade (98.6 F) is "normal body temperature," and a hot summer day (except to folks in the Southern plains where temperatures of forty-five Centigrade (113 F) and Southwest desert areas, where summer temperatures of fifty Centigrade (122 F) are not uncommon). Fifty-five Centigrade (131 F) is unlivable for humans. If the ambient temperature stays that high long enough, the heat alone will kill you..
I play the piano all the time, there are exactly 1 dozen of unique keys within an octave. Easier to transpose the music to another key using the dozenal math.

The metric systems can be integrated into different bases as well as long its the 10 of that specific base.

The dozenal Celsius seems to have more precision as in between the decimal Celsius and decimal Fahrenheit.
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Old 2020-08-11, 15:00   #62
VBCurtis
 
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How many people have you managed to convince that base 12 is better?
How many have you tried to convince?

Is your failure to convince anyone here due to the ideas and reasons being lousy, or is it a matter of your lack of skill at communicating the greatness of base 12?
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Old 2020-08-11, 15:00   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckerkao View Post
With the color balls, you can figure out [dozenal] 1/3 = 0.4, [hex] 1/3 = 0.555...
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckerkao View Post
Let's give the quiz out, how many American people actually recognize [dozenal] 1/3 = 0.4 and 2/3 = 0.8, 1/4 = 0.3, 3/4 = 0.9?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckerkao View Post
The United States is 1 of the very few nations that had rejected the Metric System and still stuck on the Imperial system like foot and inch.
You appear to be in conflict with yourself. You advocate a base 12 system. Then you advocate a base 10 system to measure. And you point out the one base 12 unit of measure as supposedly inferior.

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Old 2020-08-11, 15:20   #64
xilman
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Akkadian sexagesimal uses 17 characters to represent forty quadrillion, exactly the same as decimal.
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Old 2020-08-11, 15:24   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckerkao View Post
So I need more than 1 character for some numerical symbols. What if I want to count up to a large number such as several trillions in that base?

The numerical symbols I use can stand up to quintillions and still not too long.
Oh, for $DEITY's sake: cuneiform sexagesimal is a positional system. You express large numbers using exactly the same procedure as most people do with decimal.

Here is the number forty quadrillion expressed in decimal: 40000000000000000

Here is as it would be represented by an Akkadian dubsar:

𒐗 π’π’œ π’œ π’π’œ π’π’Ž π’Œ‹π’ˆ π’‘Š π’Š π’‘Š π’Œ‹π’• 𒐋 𒐏

3 :58:8:58:49:13:0:5:0:11:6:40

The π’‘Šsign was used to signify an intermediate zero. It was not used in a terminal position, the power of sixty intended was determined from context.

Note that this time I have used alternative representations for twenty, thirty, forty and fifty.
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Old 2020-08-11, 17:25   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chalsall View Post
E.Mayer... A sincere question.

When discussing economics with "normals", ...
And just to think that someone mentioned "normals" in this thread...

I know, I know, - it was an honest mistake. Chris is too trusting.
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