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Old 2006-01-10, 18:43   #1
xilman
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Default The Happy Fish thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by akruppa
My Dwarf Gurami (Colisa Lalia) have little baby fish now. The first eggs are just hatching. I hope a few of them survive, they are tiny and very difficult to feed during the first few days.

Alex
Excellent! What do you feed them on?

I received a packet of papyrus seeds (Cyperus papyris) in the mail today from one of my brothers. He knows I like growing marginal plants (in both senses of the word!) and thought I may like to give them a try. Papyrus seeds are also extremely tiny and it's recommended that they be mixed with silver sand before trying to sow them.

The winters are too cold here for papyrus to live out of doors without shelter. OTOH, I have two different Agave species, some baby Dicksonia antarctica and an olive tree all living happily on the back yard with only very slight shelter from the cold. The big agave needs shelter from the rain and snow more than from cold weather. As long as it is dry it will withstand -5C with ease and has reached -8 this year and last with only minor damage. Papyrus, OTOH, has to be kept wet and I can see that being a problem when the temperature goes below freezing.

A prickly pear (an Opuntia cactus) has been living out of doors in the Cambridge botanic garden for many years. It's one of the most northerly cacti in the world that doesn't have any kind of weather protection. Again, it's kept very dry. In this case, it's planted in soil with a lot of sand and gravel and is growing on a steep bank so water drains away very rapidly. Cambridge is classified as semi-arid anyway (annual rainfall is about 50cm) so things tend not to get too wet for too long.

Paul
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Old 2006-01-10, 23:56   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman
Excellent! What do you feed them on?
I bought food specifically for the larvae of small fish that lay eggs, as the Gurami do. It is Artemia Salina ground into microscopic powder, in a liquid. I don't feed them yet as they are still feeding on the yolk sac, but I think I may have to start sometime tomorrow. I'll also prepare Artemia nauplia for when they are a little bigger, and already have frozen Cyclops I sometimes feed to the Rasbora Hengeli that live in the same tank.

I only found out about the babies when I wrecked the foam nest by mistake. The male started building the nest about a week ago but it seemed as if the female wasn't ready. The nest started to fall apart now, but when I tried to remove the remains, I noticed the eggs. They must have laid them yesterday, without me noticing even tough I was home all day. The father collected most of the scattered eggs and returned them to the now defunct nest, I collected the remaining ones and put them into a rearing box.

I hope at least a few survive. That several were lost due to my mistake is a shame, but will probably not matter in the end. The tank is tiny (only 54L) so I could not raise more than maybe 10, and Colisa Lalia lay up to 600 eggs...

Alex
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Old 2006-01-11, 02:54   #3
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At the risk of making this The Happy Fish thread:

It was interesting to watch the breeding habits of our various cichlid species.

Many cichilds are mouthbreeders and the process is interesting to watch, especially with the Melanochromis johanni that we had. As the female lays her eggs she performs a sort of dance. As each egg emerges, she spins around, picks it up in her mouth and then snaps back to lay the next one. If one gets away it is pursued with great vigour.

This process continues until all of the eggs (twenty to thirty in our experience) have been passed and picked up.

In our tank necessarily, and I suppose on purpose in the wild, the male is nearby. The male is a deep dark blue but on his ventral fin are one or more bright white spots, similar in shape, size and colour to an egg. After the female has picked up her eggs, the male somewhat "dances" in front of her and she see the 'egg' on his ventral and pursues it. It being in proximity to his reproductive organs, it's not difficult to see how the eggs are fertilized.

The brood grows in the mother's mouth. Eventually the spawn become too large to fit in the mouth and some escape. By the time they can escape they are usually mature enough to survive as long as there are no predators in the tank. As they are reaching maturity you can sometimes sneak slowly and quietly to the aquarium, in the near dark, and see a small cloud of spawn floating near the mother's mouth (about 2cm to 4 cm away). If the mother catches sight of your movement, she snaps them up in an instant (it's incredibly fast; I've seen eight to ten picked up in less than a second).

The mother tries to eat, even with the brood in her mouth, and seems to be somewhat successful, but she does become visibly emanciated by the end of the process.

Our Tropheus moori and Tropheus duboisi went through much the same process but they do not employ the egg spot technique.

And the most interesting (but gruesome) of all: Synodontis multipunctatus have evolved to take advantage of mouth brooders. As the female cichlid lays her eggs this catfish swims into the fray eating the cichlid eggs and laying its own! The cichlid often picks up the interloper's eggs, mistaking them for her own. The multipunctatus eggs hatch more rapidly than the cichlid's and the ravenous little things proceed to consume, while still in their host's mouth, the cichlid spawn (shudder...). Typically, the host cichlid obliviously carries the multipunctatus until they mature and escape.

Don Leclair
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Old 2006-01-11, 04:22   #4
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The fish they come.....

goes to get foil helmet
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Old 2006-01-11, 16:41   #5
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Maybe better make a fishnet helmet...

Gurami are pretty amazing fish, too. They are so called labyrinth fish as they have a second breathing organ in addition to the gills: tightly folded tissue that looks like a labyrinth, hence the name. By the labyrinth they can breathe air which allows them to live in very oxygen-poor water, such as flooded fields that heat up very quickly. When the fields dry out, the fish can flop or crawl from one puddle to the next, looking for deeper water. Some labyrinth are so highly developed that the fish can stay out of the water for hours or days, so long as his skin does not dry out. One species (Anabas testudineus) is said to even climb on trees to eat small fruit, giving the name "Climbing Fish" to the Gurami family.

Alex
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Old 2006-03-15, 13:40   #6
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Default The Happy Fish thread.


An expert on whales was telling friends some of the unusual findings he had made.
"For instance" he said " some whales can communicate at a distance of 500 kilometres"
"What on earth would one whale say to the other 500 Kms away?" asked an astounded member of the group.
"Im not absolutely sure" answered the expert " but it sounds something like "Can you still hear me?"
Mally
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Old 2006-03-15, 18:19   #7
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So the one whale says to the other whale 500 kms away, "Boy, this water sure is cold, and I'm so very hungry." A few minutes later, the other whale replies "Oh, stop your blubbering." First whale comes back with, "But I'm a Blue Whale." Second whale: "Oh, sorry - guess getting enough food must be a real strain for you." First whale: "Say, how is it that we can hear each other so clearly this far apart?" Second whale: "Dunno - must be some kind of a fluke." First whale: "Stop it already, you're krilling me..."
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Old 2006-03-15, 19:19   #8
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500 kms away in the other direction a third whale can't quite make out the conversation.

He says: "Speak up! I'm hard of herring!"
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Old 2006-03-15, 23:33   #9
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Yes, a million laughs, we're kraken everybody up with our fishy jokes ... why, on a scale from 1 to 10, that last one by Don rates at least a seven-point-zeroe. Humor so good it could be used for 'eeling the sick, I say...

And while we're on the subject of eels: there's a classic scene in the movie Roman Holiday in which Princess Ann (played by Audrey Hepburn), after an unsanctioned and potentially highly scandalous (at least by 1950s family-fare standards) night on the town, wakes up to find herself in the humble flat of tabloid reporter Joe Bradley (played by Gregory Peck). Realizing the embarassment potential of the situation she's put herself in, the Princess (maintaining her flimsy pretense to be someone else) runs out of the apartment, tailed by Joe, who is still not 100% certain she is who he thinks she is, and figures to clinch the case by seeing where she is scampering off to. As she attempts to find her way through the streets of Rome back to her imperial lodgings, the princess happens to find herself in the middle of an open-air Roman fish market, face to face with an animated fishmonger brandishing an impressively large eel which he wants to sell. The question is, what kind of eel is it? Answer (in highly encrypted form) follows.

!yarom a s'tI:A
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Old 2006-03-16, 02:08   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akruppa
By the labyrinth they can breathe air which allows them to live in very oxygen-poor water, such as flooded fields that heat up very quickly. When the fields dry out, the fish can flop or crawl from one puddle to the next, looking for deeper water.
Alex, I don't know if you know it yourself, but probably you know where I should look for it... do you have any idea if there is a species of that kind of fish down here in Brazil, in a place called Lençóis Maranhenses? It's a bizarre sandy region where annual rainfall is concentrated in a few months. So, during those months, small ponds form between the dunes, and in the other months it looks like an actual desert. But there are fish in those ponds! I wonder whether they belong to that kind you mentioned...

Thanks
Bruno
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Old 2006-03-16, 17:03   #11
mfgoode
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Thumbs up The Happy Fish thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer
So the one whale says to the other whale 500 kms away, "Boy, this water sure is cold, and I'm so very hungry." A few minutes later, the other whale replies "Oh, stop your blubbering." First whale comes back with, "But I'm a Blue Whale." Second whale: "Oh, sorry - guess getting enough food must be a real strain for you." First whale: "Say, how is it that we can hear each other so clearly this far apart?" Second whale: "Dunno - must be some kind of a fluke." First whale: "Stop it already, you're krilling me..."
You are a master of the English Language and a wizard with words! Your last two posts are really excellent and so is dleclairs.

!yarom a s'tI:A Is that "Its a moray?"

Yes I remember 'Roman Holiday' closely linked to 'Three coins in the fountain'
Both 'Must Seas' ! I have several times visited the 'Fountain de Trevi' and found a lot of mermaids around, including the sculpture in the centre ( I recall)
Throwing three 100 Lire coins often brought me luck and many a time they were fishy dishes.
In the Arabian sea and the Bay of Bengal a delicacy is Pomfret which I love esp. in fried fillet crumbed form with a 'masala' to add.
It beats tuna IMO though a close second to Pink or Red Salmon esp. prepared by John West
I am afraid of Sharks and barracuda esp found in the Brazilian waters and rivers. They are one 'ell of a threat! Remember 'Mack the Knife' with his jack knife which he keeps out of sight. Ah! those were the days.
And Zilman says Im showing my age. I am rich in my memories man which no one can take from me.
So on with the thread! The sea is rich with denizens of the deep. Lets cast our nets and harvest. Hey remember MOBY DICK ? What a movie! And we are back to whales!
Mally
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