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Old 2021-10-22, 12:17   #1
greenskull
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Default 千里之行始於足下

I really like these words.
I myself often use them in my life and work.

千里之行始於足下 = A thousand miles begins with a single step

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There is another form of the same thought attributed to Confucius.
The journey of a 10,000 li begins with a single step.

By the way, 1 li = 300..500 m = 1 000..1 700 ft
So, 10 000 li = 3 000..5 000 km = 1 900..3 100 mi

This is roughly a one-way Columbus journey.

Last fiddled with by greenskull on 2021-10-22 at 12:28
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Old 2021-10-22, 14:26   #2
Viliam Furik
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenskull View Post
This is roughly a one-way Columbus journey.
From what I know from school, Columbus went from Spain to the Bahamas. Assuming a direct route, that's at least 6000 km.
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Old 2021-10-22, 16:02   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenskull View Post
<snip>
There is another form of the same thought attributed to Confucius.
The journey of a 10,000 li begins with a single step.
You're full of baloney.

The page you cite does not render the proverb that way, and does not even mention Confucius.

According to the very page you cite, Wikipedia's Li (unit), (my emphasis)
Quote:
One Chinese name for the Great Wall is the "Ten-Thousand-Li Long Wall" (traditional 萬里長城, simplified 万里长城, Pinyin Wànlǐchángchéng). As in Greek, the number "ten thousand" is used figuratively in Chinese to mean any "immeasurable" value and this title has never provided a literal distance.
So "ten thousand li" means something like "a jillion miles." It's not intended to be rendered as a specific distance.

Also, (my emphasis)
Quote:
The Chinese proverb appearing in chapter 64 of the Tao Te Ching and commonly rendered as "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step" in fact refers to a thousand li: 千里之行,始於足下 (Qiānlǐzhīxíng, shǐyúzúxià).
Not ten thousand. Copy-paste does not lie!

The usual attribution is to "Lao Tzu" (Laozi), who may be a composite of various historians who created the Tao Te Ching, rather than to Confucius.
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Old 2021-10-22, 16:37   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
You're full of baloney.
The link I gave gives an idea of the measure of length. I read about Confucius elsewhere.

There are two versions of this proverb - one mentioning 1000 and the other 10,000 li. In this case, it doesn't matter at all 1000 or 10 thousand. Since the point is not in the exact total length of the path, but in the fact that the great begins with the small.

I also have Google for your information. All that you wrote, I read it myself :)
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Old 2021-10-22, 18:14   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenskull View Post
<snip>
In this case, it doesn't matter at all 1000 or 10 thousand. Since the point is not in the exact total length of the path, but in the fact that the great begins with the small.
<snip>
That is my understanding of the proverb's meaning.

But somebody rendered 1000 li and 10,000 li into a range of specific distances, and drew a comparison to "a one-way Columbus journey."

Like I said - you're full of baloney.
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Old 2021-10-22, 19:31   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
That is my understanding of the proverb's meaning.

But somebody rendered 1000 li and 10,000 li into a range of specific distances, and drew a comparison to "a one-way Columbus journey."

Like I said - you're full of baloney.
Nothing like this. In fact, you are full of baloney, because you did not say anything that was fundamentally different from my words or went against them.
If you are embarrassed that the distance between Spain and the Bahamas is somewhat greater, then you simply did not pay attention to my word "roughly".
I do not pretend to be accurate here, but only compare close values.
You can find exact comparisons yourself and devote your thread to this.

Last fiddled with by greenskull on 2021-10-22 at 19:59
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Old 2021-11-18, 00:56   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenskull View Post
千里之行始於足下 = A thousand miles begins with a single step
Really. However we are now using simplified Chinese, which reads "千里之行始于足下" (于 is the simplified version of 於).
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Old 2021-11-18, 01:52   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhangrc View Post
Really. However we are now using simplified Chinese, which reads "千里之行始于足下" (于 is the simplified version of 於).
It certainly looks simpler with far fewer lines. But, "Looks can be deceiving". This certainly is, from my vantage point.

ETA So the only difference between the Traditional and Simplified for this sentence is that one character?
I thought the whole writing of sentences would be different.

Last fiddled with by a1call on 2021-11-18 at 01:56
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Old 2021-11-18, 04:06   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a1call View Post
It certainly looks simpler with far fewer lines. But, "Looks can be deceiving". This certainly is, from my vantage point.

ETA So the only difference between the Traditional and Simplified for this sentence is that one character?
I thought the whole writing of sentences would be different.
You can only simplify so much in a one-character-per-word system...

(I know that's not an accurate statement, but it's as close as the OP's claim of the distance the Columbus went.)
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