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Old 2018-12-16, 10:54   #56
enzocreti
 
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Naaaaaaaaa...that's a bad example
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Old 2018-12-16, 11:09   #57
enzocreti
 
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Primes of this form follow a rule...the only problem is that there yet too few many primes found and the rule is so difficult that only a top mathematician could find it
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Old 2018-12-16, 13:03   #58
Dr Sardonicus
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enzocreti View Post
when k is a multiple of 43, it seems that pg(k), when it is prime (or probable prime), follows a pattern!
Quote:
Every crime has its own pattern of logic. Everything has an order. If we cannot find that order, it's not because it doesn't exist... but because we have incorrectly examined
s-s-some vital piece of evidence.

Let us examine the evidence.

Number one: In the past six months, there have been 345 homicides committed in this city. The victims have ranged various-s-sly in age... sex, social status and-and color.

Number two: In none of these homicides have we been able to find the motive.

Number three: Consequently, all 345 homicides remain unsolved.

So much for the evidence. A subtle pattern begins to emerge. What is this pattern? What is it that these 345 homicides... have-have-have, uh-uh-uh... have in common? They... They have in common three things:

A: They have nothing in common:

B: They have no motive:

And

C: They remain unsolved.
-- Lieutenent Practice, Little Murders (1971)
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Old 2018-12-16, 16:03   #59
CRGreathouse
 
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Originally Posted by enzocreti View Post
Primes of this form follow a rule...the only problem is that there yet too few many primes found and the rule is so difficult that only a top mathematician could find it
Do you have any evidence supporting this bold assertion?
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Old 2018-12-16, 16:49   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enzocreti View Post
Primes of this form follow a rule...the only problem is that there yet too few many primes found and the rule is so difficult that only a top mathematician could find it
I still think the Strong law of Small numbers applies:



if the exponent d was more regular, you'd expect such runs. it just happens regular for long stretches
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Old 2018-12-16, 16:56   #61
enzocreti
 
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Now i think i will drop the ace:


pg(215), pg(69660) and pg(92020) are probable primes (215,69660,92020 are multiples of 215).

Amazingly pg(215), pg(69660) and pg(92020) are all congruent to 15 mod 31!!!
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Old 2018-12-16, 17:22   #62
Batalov
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enzocreti View Post
Naaaaaaaaa...that's a bad example
Tigger is introduced in Chapter II of House at Pooh Corner, when he arrives at Winnie-the-Pooh's doorstep in the middle of the night, announcing himself with a stylised roar.

Most of the rest of that chapter is taken up with the characters' search for a food that Tigger can eat for breakfast — despite Tigger's claims to like "everything," it is quickly proven he does not like honey, acorns, thistles, or most of the contents of Kanga's larder.
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Old 2018-12-16, 19:43   #63
enzocreti
 
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Default pk(215k)

all pg(215k)'s are congruent to 15 mod 31!
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Old 2018-12-16, 19:57   #64
Batalov
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enzocreti View Post
all pg(215k)'s are congruent to 15 mod 31!
Stop being silly. 215k is divisible by 5.
All pg(m) are congruent to 15 mod 31 when 5|m -- which is entirely obvious.

That's some ace you got. "Three values that could not be anything but 15 mod 31, turned out to be 15 mod 31. Oh the shock!"
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Old 2018-12-16, 22:37   #65
JM Montolio A
 
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The prime numbers dont follows any rule.

They are the small few survivors after all the rules applied.

At infinite only the gap fills the black space, and they looks like lonely stars.
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Old 2018-12-17, 08:34   #66
enzocreti
 
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Default pg(69660), pg(92020), pg(541456)

pg(69660), pg(92020) and pg(541456) are probbale primes and they are all congruent to 7 mod 10.
So it seems that when pg(86k) is prime, then it is congruent to 7 mod 10!
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