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Old 2020-01-25, 21:14   #1552
Dr Sardonicus
 
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Don't worry. The forthcoming frog population explosion will eat up the locusts.

Start worrying when the rivers turn to blood.
Funny you should mention that - from my local fishwrap yesterday:

The Russian River flowed with a cherry red tint Wednesday after tens of thousands of gallons of fresh cabernet sauvignon wine poured into the largest tributary in Sonoma County.
The "Red Russian River" story was picked up by the AP.

Just this past July, a fire at a Jim Beam barrel warehouse sent a huge spill of bourbon down the creek and into the Kentucky and Ohio Rivers, killing fish. Besides having their warehouse struck by lightning and losing 40,000 barrels of whiskey in the ensuing fire, they had to reimburse the Great State of Kentucky $112,000.00, and they agreed to pay a $600,000.00 fine.
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Old 2020-01-28, 14:51   #1553
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Start worrying when the rivers turn to blood.
Blood came first, then frogs, the locust were later (after the hail) When the darkness happens....
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Old 2020-01-28, 14:55   #1554
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For quite some time I have been hesitant to fly. Looking at my total GHG footprint, a flight would be the major item any year.
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Old 2020-01-28, 17:30   #1555
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Now if the US could get its act together concerning passenger trains we could improve our emissions status considerably. High speed electric trains could be competitive with airplanes over some range of distances. Even when the travel time is greater, the time needed to access trains stations is likely to be less than that needed to access airports.
EDIT: Unfortunately, Amtrak has long been abused like the proverbial red-headed step child. Requiring that a public service make a profit in place of subsidies is one of the crippling factors. Lack of suitable right of ways is another. Effective high speed rail needs long straight runs and isolation from other surface traffic. Both of those are hard to come by. Budget hawks who whine about subsidizing rail conveniently ignore the huge subsidies bestowed on air travel. Think air traffic control as just one example.

Last fiddled with by kladner on 2020-01-28 at 17:37
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Old 2020-02-08, 21:16   #1556
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Climate Change Linked to Drop in Bumble Bee Numbers: Study
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Increasing overall temperatures due to climate change along with severe spikes of heat are tied to drops in bumble bee numbers in North America and Europe faster than they can find new habitats, according to a study published Thursday (February 6) in Science.

To get a sense of how bees have fared over the last century, the authors turned to bee observations over time cataloged by museums across North America and Europe. These included more than 500,000 sightings of 66 bumble bee species in two time periods: 1901–1974 and 2000–2014. A single observation is defined as evidence of a nearby hive, whether one bee is spotted or the entire hive. The statistical analysis showed that in the latter period, sightings in North America were down 46 percent, while Europe saw losses around 17 percent.
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Old 2020-03-10, 16:52   #1557
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Default If Jeff Bezos really wants to fight the climate crisis, he should just pay his taxes

https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...xes-california
Bezos is the standard bearer for the irresponsible wealthy. Splashy charity donations fall under the PR and Advertising category. Paying taxes is not nearly so rewarding, though it might make a pretty big publicity event if Bezos did it. Further in the article a ballot initiative is promoted, Schools and Communities First, which would close the loophole for huge, wealthy companies, while leaving it for small businesses.

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In the wake of the devastating Australian bushfires, Jeff Bezos announced last month that he will donate $10bn to fight the climate crisis. As a resident of California and the former president of the Sierra Club Foundation, I welcome any contribution toward the struggle against our changing climate. That said, my home state, like all communities with Amazon facilities, would be far better off if Bezos simply paid his taxes.

If Amazon’s properties in California were taxed at their current value, the added tax could help bolster our underfunded firefighters and fix our crumbling fire access roads. Contributing vast sums to the global effort is wonderful, but climate change is a local issue too. Our communities need to be well-funded if we’re going to face this threat head-on.
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The commercial loophole in Proposition 13, which allows many corporations in California to avoid paying significant amounts of property taxes, unintentionally depleted the funding our communities now desperately need. As a result, our emergency response systems have suffered. According to the California Professional Firefighters, the number of unfulfilled requests for resources and equipment has grown over the past few years despite those resources being needed more urgently than ever. Worse, the Trump administration has promised to cut millions of dollars from the US Forest Service’s firefighting services, with additional cuts to funding for local volunteer firefighting departments.

As a result of these shortfalls, firefighters across the state have been forced to appeal to voters to raise taxes to secure consistent funding. That’s a shame. Our public emergency services shouldn’t have to beg for the funding that they need to operate in the largest and most prosperous state in the country.
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Old 2020-03-10, 21:15   #1558
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Originally Posted by kladner View Post
https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...xes-california
<snip>
Further in the article a ballot initiative is promoted, Schools and Communities First, which would close the loophole for huge, wealthy companies, while leaving it for small businesses.
It's not so much a "loophole" as yet another advantage that corporate persons have over natural persons.

If I've read things right, by Howard Jarvis's 1978 Proposition 13, annual increases in real estate tax rates are severely limited; and real estate isn't reassessed unless it changes ownership. So, if a property has been in the same hands for a long time, and has gone up in value over that time, it's being taxed on far less than its actual value.

And while people die, and residential properties consequently change ownership, a corporation can own an industrial or commercial property indefinitely. And it's the corporation that is thereby avoiding taxes.

BTW if I understand correctly, LA's Measure FD failed; it got 57% of the vote, but, being a local measure, needed over 2/3 of the votes to pass (thanks to the 1978 Proposition 13).

Also, the present-day "Proposition 13" appears to have failed. The November ballot issue allowing reassessment of commercial and industrial properties would appear to have an uphill battle.
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Old 2020-03-12, 01:01   #1559
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What a world, what a world.
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Old 2020-04-29, 21:47   #1560
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o Quantifying methane emissions from the largest oil-producing basin in the United States from space | Science
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Based on satellite measurements from May 2018 to March 2019, Permian methane emissions from oil and natural gas production are estimated to be 2.7 ± 0.5 Tg a−1, representing the largest methane flux ever reported from a U.S. oil/gas-producing region and are more than two times higher than bottom-up inventory-based estimates. This magnitude of emissions is 3.7% of the gross gas extracted in the Permian, i.e., ~60% higher than the national average leakage rate. The high methane leakage rate is likely contributed by extensive venting and flaring, resulting from insufficient infrastructure to process and transport natural gas.
A small explication for the non-professional-scientists re. the total-emissions measure quoted from the abstract: "2.7 ± 0.5 Tg a−1" means Tg/a, with 'a' standing for 'annum', i.e. 2.7 teragrams per year, or 2.7 megatons per year. But it's important to put that relative to total annual global emissions, or as I do here, as a percentage total CH4 in the atmosphere - per Wikipedia, "Atmospheric methane concentrations have reached almost two-and-a-half times pre-industrial levels or 3.2 billion tons", thus the above Permian-basin emissions amounted to roughly 0.1% of total atmospheric methane, each year. Since the removal time of CH4 is ~10 years (significantly shorter than for CO2 - a small silver lining), a sustained added 0.1% per year would raise total atmospheric methane levels by around 1%. But all those economic-groaf-correlated added percents add up. Another interesting nugget I found on the above page's by-country breakdown: China is by far the world's largest methane emitter, and has been for a long time, long predating the Chinese economic miracle - they were already ahead of the US by ~30% back in 1970, and as of 2012 (the latest year cited in the per-county breakdown @above) they had more than doubled their annual CH4 emissions. Over the same span the US methane emissions actually dropped modestly - though the fracking boom likely has at least partly reversed that trend - thus as of 2012 China emissions were 3.5x that of the U.S., implying rough parity on a per-capita basis. Of course quite a bit of the added China emissions are due to the U.S. and most of the rest of the West offshoring their manufacturing, and the attendant resource consumption and pollution emissions, there in recent decades.

o Is fungus the answer to climate change? Student who grew a mushroom canoe says yes. | NBC
Quote:
In addition to their ability to break down harmful pollutants and chemicals, [Kary Ayers, 28, a student at Central Community College in Columbus, Nebraska] pointed out that mushrooms can be used for everything from household insulation to furniture to packaging, replacing plastics, Styrofoam and other materials that are hard to recycle and harmful to the environment. ‘Mushrooms are here to help us — they’re a gift,’ Ayers said. ‘There’s so much we can do with them beyond just food; it’s so limitless. They’re our biggest ally for helping the environment.
Reader comment: "Ayer’s one-off mushroom canoe cost $500, half the average cost of a new canoe. Plus you can use it for pizza topping at end-of-life."

o Michael Moore climate film snubs solar and urges population control, ruffling mainstream movement | MarketWatch -- A reader comments on the chimera of Green Energy:

"Even before that film I have been very skeptical about green energy as merely a ploy not to make changes in our consumption and behavior. Plus, those attempting to sell us on alternative energy rarely want to talk about resource churn, installation life cycles, or the impossibility of recycling their product.

A typical ploy was one by Duke Energy who created a LLC to install more than 50 Vestas V-100 wind turbines on top of my township. I was offered a contract so had a good look at the destruction that would have been visited on us. A giveaway was that no funds would have been put into escrow for decommissioning until 20 years after installation. These turbines have a lifespan of about 20 to 25 years, and not only are they massive above ground, but their bases are incredibly massive structures. After collecting huge subsidies, Duke could abandon those installations and leave landowners with the mess. They count on peoply unable to take them on. Residents licensed multiple heliports in the township which precluded any turbine installation in our airspace."
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Old 2020-05-20, 13:03   #1561
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https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52719662

It is amazing that one long-haul airplane flight is almost equal to a year of using a car.
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Old 2020-05-20, 13:36   #1562
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It is amazing that one long-haul airplane flight is almost equal to a year of using a car.
Which is why I personally have avoided flying vacations for a while now.
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