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Old 2019-10-09, 16:27   #1541
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_thermal_power is one option. It can store energy as heat during the day and use it to generate electricity overnight.

And in a large country power lines can help match generation and demand. Eg electricity demand in the evening on the east coast of the USA could be supplied by PV panels further west. And it would be rare for the whole of North America to have light winds at the same time so exports from areas with a surplus could go to areas with a shortfall.

But of course the one thing the article didn't mention was Nuclear Power.

Chris
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Old 2019-10-25, 19:32   #1542
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Extinction Rebellion Has a Politics Problem | Current Affairs
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‘Beyond Politics’ is a slogan at the center of Extinction Rebellion organizing: You can see it on posters, on flyers, on candy-colored flags…. I do not think it is possible to find an apolitical solution to a political problem…. Another reason why this supposedly apolitical position is deeply worrying is because of the increasing prominence of ecofascism, whose adherents embrace both aspects of the green movement and militant xenophobia. Since Extinction Rebellion’s founding, the perpetrators of two major mass shootings—one at a WalMart in El Paso, the other at a mosque in Christchurch—have left behind manifestos that root their xenophobia in ecological concerns. Whether they frame nature conservation in explicitly nationalistic terms, or latch onto overpopulation as an excuse for curbing nonwhite populations, or argue that climate change needs to be halted because of the waves of migration from the global south that will inevitably result, ecofascists are a growing presence within white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups in the United States and elsewhere. To be clear, XR has in no way endorsed these kinds of far-right beliefs. But in the absence of taking any strong stance in the opposite direction, the movement leaves room for these kinds of reactionary forces to gather strength from the mass appeal of XR’s galvanizing pro-green message, its media attention, and its organizing systems.
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Old 2019-10-31, 01:02   #1543
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris2be8 View Post
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_thermal_power is one option. It can store energy as heat during the day and use it to generate electricity overnight.

And in a large country power lines can help match generation and demand. Eg electricity demand in the evening on the east coast of the USA could be supplied by PV panels further west. And it would be rare for the whole of North America to have light winds at the same time so exports from areas with a surplus could go to areas with a shortfall.

But of course the one thing the article didn't mention was Nuclear Power.

Chris
Longer high power transmission lines have drawbacks. The longer the transmission lines, the greater the losses. AC lines, in particular, have losses from a number of causes. For long distances, HVDC (high voltage direct current) is really the way to minimize transmission losses, but it incurs its own losses with the conversions from AC to DC to AC. However, the balance must be favorable or this technique would not have had such a long history.
from later in the Wiki, see also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-v...ments_in_UHVDC

Last fiddled with by kladner on 2019-10-31 at 01:24 Reason: reason for commenting
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Old 2019-11-18, 12:52   #1544
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Climate said to imperil 60% of Superfund sites
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WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says.

In a report being released Monday, the Government Accountability Office called on Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler to state directly that dealing with the rising risks of seas, storms or wildfires breaching Superfund sites under climate change is part of the agency’s mission.
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Old 2019-12-12, 01:27   #1545
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Flooded farmers face growing dilemma in warming world
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<snip>
It’s very difficult to directly tie this year’s flooding — or any single weather event — to climate change. But the flooding comes as "we're seeing big rain and even bigger snows that are consistent with what we will see in a warming world," because a warmer atmosphere delivers more water to storm systems, said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration climate monitoring chief Deke Arndt.

The number of heavy rain events has increased throughout much of the U.S., including the Midwest, where the days with at least one inch of rain averaged 13% higher from 2009 to 2018 than the long-term average dating to 1950, according to NOAA.

In Missouri, the number of annual 4-inch (10.2-centimeter) or greater rainfalls was 58% higher than the long-term average. In Iowa, the increase was 31% and in Nebraska it was 23%.
<snip>
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Old 2020-01-24, 22:20   #1546
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The chemists policing Earth’s atmosphere for rogue pollution | Nature
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[Atmospheric chemist Martin Vollmer], who works at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA) in Dübendorf, specializes in sniffing out newly emerging trace gases, which make up less than 1% by volume of the planet’s atmosphere…. Behind the scenes, scientists such as Vollmer are keeping watch over the health of the atmosphere — in part to make sure nations are honouring their promises…. For many years, the news coming from these air-monitoring campaigns was good. Concentrations of CFCs and several other dangerous compounds were declining steadily. It was the biggest win in environmental policy the world has ever seen, say researchers… Then, in May 2018, Montzka reported a disturbing blip: levels of one of the most harmful chemicals, trichlorofluoromethane, known as CFC-11, weren’t dropping as fast as expected1, suggesting that companies were producing this compound somewhere, in violation of the protocol. ‘It was the most surprising and shocking thing I’ve seen in my entire career,’ Montzka says. Montzka’s research pointed to eastern Asia, and a follow-up study last May pinpointed the source of a significant fraction of the emissions to two provinces in China.
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Old 2020-01-25, 01:06   #1547
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer View Post
Bears some resemblance to the posting in Naked Capitalism under the topic heading The Biosphere.

[W.C. Fields voice]It must be a coincidence...[/W.C. Fields voice]
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Old 2020-01-25, 15:08   #1548
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How climate change feeds Africa locust invasion
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JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Locusts by the millions are nibbling their way across a large part of Africa in the worst outbreak some places have seen in 70 years. Is this another effect of a changing climate? Yes, researchers say. An unprecedented food security crisis may be the result.
<snip>
Heavy rains in East Africa made 2019 one of the region's wettest years on record, said Nairobi-based climate scientist Abubakr Salih Babiker. He blamed rapidly warming waters in the Indian Ocean off Africa's eastern coast, which also spawned an unusual number of strong tropical cyclones off Africa last year.

Heavy rainfall and warmer temperatures are favorable conditions for locust breeding and in this case the conditions have become "exceptional," he said.

Even now rainfall continues in some parts of the vast region. The greenery that springs up keeps the locusts fuelled.
Climate change seems to be contributing to a lot of woes. Droughts. Floods. Volcanic eruptions. Now, plagues of locusts.
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Old 2020-01-25, 16:26   #1549
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
How climate change feeds Africa locust invasion
Climate change seems to be contributing to a lot of woes. Droughts. Floods. Volcanic eruptions. Now, plagues of locusts.
Don't worry. The forthcoming frog population explosion will eat up the locusts.

Start worrying when the rivers turn to blood.
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Old 2020-01-25, 19:41   #1550
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Don't worry. The forthcoming frog population explosion will eat up the locusts.

Start worrying when the rivers turn to blood.
Funny you should mention that - from my local fishwrap yesterday:

The Russian River flowed with a cherry red tint Wednesday after tens of thousands of gallons of fresh cabernet sauvignon wine poured into the largest tributary in Sonoma County.
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Old 2020-01-25, 20:03   #1551
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Could Sleeper Trains Replace International Air Travel? | naked capitalism
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Dutch airline KLM recently launched a new advertising campaign called “Fly Responsibly”. Remarkably, it seems to encourage viewers to fly less. “Do you always have to meet face-to-face?”, the advert asks. “Could you take the train instead?”.

The influence of climate campaigner Greta Thunberg likely explains why airlines feel obliged to say these things. Flight shame – or “flygskam” – has gripped many regular flyers with a sense of unease about the aviation industry, which consumes five million barrels of oil a day and is predicted to account for around 22% of global carbon emissions by 2050.

European high-speed rail networks already offer an alternative to air traffic between European countries for distances shorter than 1,000 kilometres. For longer journeys, sleeper trains are becoming increasingly popular. These services run through the night and offer passengers a berth to sleep in. As more and more consumers question the ethics of their next flight, rail companies see an opportunity – and competition with airlines is heating up.
Not surprisingly, Eurasia is the ideal target market here.
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