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Old 2006-11-27, 19:04   #45
Uncwilly
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That story reminds me about the story of the tourist that wants to see the Statue of Liberty, then in the afternoon the Grand Canyon.

Another feature that cause trouble for map makers and students is the 49th and 50th states. There is no easy way to have them on the same map as the 48, with out insets. Then there is Guam, PR, the US VI, etc. (There used to be the Canal Zone, too.)
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Old 2006-11-28, 03:52   #46
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Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
That story reminds me about the story of the tourist that wants to see the Statue of Liberty, then in the afternoon the Grand Canyon.
Yes, I've known a few visitors with similar aspirations.

Last fiddled with by drew on 2006-11-28 at 03:56
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Old 2006-11-28, 10:30   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
Another feature that cause trouble for map makers and students is the 49th and 50th states. There is no easy way to have them on the same map as the 48, with out insets. Then there is Guam, PR, the US VI, etc.
I found this comment very interesting: how often do cartographers attempt to show the whole USA without insets? I ask because in the UK it is rare to see a map that does not have the Shetland Islands moved a few hundred miles south and inset which -to soft southerners like me- colours my perception of the shape of the country.

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Old 2006-11-28, 18:34   #48
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Originally Posted by cheesehead View Post
Read more carefully, Mally!

I wrote "maps we ... use in daily life." I, and most other people I know, use flat maps in everyday life far, far more often than we use globes. There are comparatively few people who routinely use globes for everyday map consultation.

Can you, Mally, truthfully say that you use a globe in your daily life more often than you use a flat map? Do you carry a globe in your car, or are all your driving maps flat and folded the way mine are? Do your newspapers or magazines incorporate globes, or do they use flat maps on their printed pages?

Even though there have been dozens (probably hundreds by now) of flat maps mailed to subscribers in issues of National Geographic magazine, AFAIK the National Geographic Society has never mailed a globe as a magazine insert or used one as an illustration in an article. (Flat projections of a globe, yes, but not a globe itself.)

Obviously, they do. But they use flat projections of the global surface more frequently than they use actual globes.

Imagine a flat wall map of the 48 contiguous United States large enough for the kids seated on the other side of the room to adequately see -- say, 2 meters high. What would be the diameter of a globe that incorporated the United States at the same scale? How big a hole in the roof and/or the floor of a 4-meter-high room would be necessary to accomodate the portions of that globe that would not fit within the 4 meter height of the room?

Suppose a schoolroom had a 1-meter-diameter globe. How large would the state of Wisconsin be on that globe? From how far away could a student with 20/20 vision be expected to discern the Door Peninsula on the northeast of our state on that globe? How many students could ordinarily be seated at their desks within that distance?

Now -- do you have any _real_ refutation of what I wrote, that "One reason" for the low scores might be what I said it was?

When you look at a typical map of India, how many other countries appear at least partially around its border? Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Tibet, China, Bhutan? That's more countries than we see on most everyday maps of my nation, isn't it?

Cheese head: I'm afraid you have gone onto a tangent and since this is completely off Topic I will not labour on your post so as not to encourage others to get off the scent. Its amazing how forum posters get easily side tracked this way.
However In all decency I will reply to you but not nit pick on this or that point.

I advised that school class rooms should have globes for a better perspective of the world in general. Specially in those were geography is taught.

I did not in any way advocate the use of globes in cars and elsewhere.

Moreover a 4' x 3' plane map is adequate to cover the world and see it at a distance for the most myopic of students. Otherwise form a circle of students at closer quarters so that they can grasp the important capitals at least so on and so forth.
In the schools Ive been in we dont have more than 20 students in a class at a time and so a class of 60 students say can be divided into 3 divisions
This ensures that students pay attention on the topic taught and dont meander as is the case in this thread. Attention wandering is a grave crime in our schools and subject to severe punishment.

I referred to my Bartholomew pocket book World Atlas (not plane folded maps, the type NG give out) and was surprised to see both Eastern and Western hemispheres neatly fitted into two 3'' circles which covered adequately the entire world!

Whereas I agree that your point is one reason still I feel its a very lame excuse to blame the Am/students inadequacy in a knowledge of geography because your national maps cannot accommodate at least the other continents.
BTW in your naming of India's neighbouring countries you forgot a very important satellite viz. Sri lanka where great cricketers come from. Geography once again and plane maps??
FYI I gave up geography in the 7th standard to offer maths yet with what I was taught was enough to navigate the world in my travels.
Mally
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Old 2006-11-29, 02:53   #49
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Originally Posted by DoktorBill View Post
Is the picture really a single flat circle or is it a flat disc with some height to it like a cake? It should have some 3 dimensional height to it. That way you can cut it into eighths on the top then you cut the entire "pie" through the middle giving you 16 pieces. Another thing you are leaving out is that the structure must be cut into 16 pieces of EQUAL size.

I just helped my kids with the same question tonite.

If we do indeed treat the problem as a pie or cake, that raises further possibilities.

If we take our knife and instead of holding the blade perpenticular to the surface disc, we can rotate the blade about it's axis thus producing a DIAGONAL cut along a plane, does this make the original problem more interesting?

In other words when applied to 3D objects, there is more scope for creative cutting (provided guests don't mind who gets the most icing).

Additionally some cuts may not necessarily intersect the upper and lower disc surfaces of the cake, for example the one used to insert the jam layer. Of course it is possible to cut portions without jam too.

In examples where the question is mistakenly phrased or ambiguous, I tend to answer the question BOTH ways, explaining how it might be interpreted and how that changes the intended meaning. This will ensure you obtain the marks awarded, irrespective of the mood of the examiner. It is annoying though in that kind of situation.

Last fiddled with by Peter Nelson on 2006-11-29 at 03:09
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Old 2006-11-29, 07:10   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Nelson View Post
If we do indeed treat the problem as a pie or cake, that raises further possibilities.

If we take our knife and instead of holding the blade perpenticular to the surface disc, we can rotate the blade about it's axis thus producing a DIAGONAL cut along a plane, does this make the original problem more interesting?
<raises hand>I got an idea</hand>

Take the knife, insert vertically into the center of the cake, sharp side toward the user.
Slowly tip the knife to the right, keeping the tip all the way through.
While tipping the knife, slowly spin the cake counter clockwise.
After about 3 revolutions, you should reach the edge.
Stop, and then make 4 cuts in the like one would normally for 8 pieces.

You now have lots of bits of cake.....
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Old 2006-11-29, 11:00   #51
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Okay, take the cake, put it in a wood chipper...
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Old 2006-11-29, 13:07   #52
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Better yet, blender!
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Old 2006-12-05, 08:41   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Nelson View Post
If we do indeed treat the problem as a pie or cake, that raises further possibilities.

If we take our knife and instead of holding the blade perpenticular to the surface disc, we can rotate the blade about it's axis thus producing a DIAGONAL cut along a plane, does this make the original problem more interesting?

In other words when applied to 3D objects, there is more scope for creative cutting (provided guests don't mind who gets the most icing).

Additionally some cuts may not necessarily intersect the upper and lower disc surfaces of the cake, for example the one used to insert the jam layer. Of course it is possible to cut portions without jam too.

In examples where the question is mistakenly phrased or ambiguous, I tend to answer the question BOTH ways, explaining how it might be interpreted and how that changes the intended meaning. This will ensure you obtain the marks awarded, irrespective of the mood of the examiner. It is annoying though in that kind of situation.

Mental gymnastics Peter?
Sadly enough the thread goes off topic about geography.
From there on it detiorates in a free for all
Mally
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