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Old 2010-01-05, 15:38   #1
ldesnogu
 
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Default New Pi Computation Record

2,699,999,990,000 digits on a personal computer

http://bellard.org/pi/pi2700e9/
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Old 2010-01-06, 13:19   #2
sonjohan
 
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This makes me think about the 'You might be addicted to GIMPS if...' thread.
All the CPU time 'wasted' for 2 letters... P I .

If it had been 3... P I E :)
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Old 2010-01-06, 13:56   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ldesnogu View Post
2,699,999,990,000 digits
He really couldn't go those extra 10,000 digits to make it an even 2.7T digits, huh?
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Old 2010-01-06, 15:14   #4
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I assume he calculated 2.7 trillion digits, but had to remove some due to rounding errors during computation. (It is necessary to keep the full precision from beginning)

In such situations i always compute some million digits more. Just in case someone asks: "And what is the 10000000001 digit?"
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Old 2010-01-06, 16:51   #5
Raman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ldesnogu View Post
2,699,999,990,000 digits on a personal computer

http://bellard.org/pi/pi2700e9/
Are there seven consecutive 7s somewhere within the decimal expansion? What is its position? What about that for eight consecutive 8s, nine consecutive 9s?

Last fiddled with by Raman on 2010-01-06 at 16:51
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Old 2010-01-06, 17:16   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonjohan View Post
This makes me think about the 'You might be addicted to GIMPS if...' thread.
All the CPU time 'wasted' for 2 letters... P I .

If it had been 3... P I E :)
If you look at the accompanying text on that link, more specially the FAQ, you will see that the whole endeavour was not about some more digits of PI but about algorithms Why did you do this ?. There is also a paper (Technical notes.)

Jacob
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Old 2010-01-06, 17:27   #7
fivemack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raman View Post
Are there seven consecutive 7s somewhere within the decimal expansion? What is its position? What about that for eight consecutive 8s, nine consecutive 9s?
Yes; indeed

http://www.hpcs.cs.tsukuba.ac.jp/~daisuke/pi.html

(yes, that page describes an earlier computation to 2.5e12 digits)

there are thirteen consecutive eights.

You could download http://gmplib.org/pi-with-gmp.html and compute a billion digits for yourself, which certainly will get you the first occurrence of 7{7} at index 3346228 and 8{8} at index 46663520; not sure about 9{9}, whose index is >2e8, unless you have access to a computer with 32GB of memory.

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/PiDigits.html may also be of interest.
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Old 2010-01-06, 18:06   #8
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You can search the first 200 Million digits of PI here.

No occurence of '999999999'.

Or searching for strings in PI here.

Last fiddled with by kar_bon on 2010-01-06 at 18:08
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Old 2010-01-06, 20:12   #9
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1.25 trillion digits:

repdigits of length 12

http://www.super-computing.org/pi-decimal_current.html

777777777777 : from 368,299,898,266-th of pi
999999999999 : from 897,831,316,556-th of pi
111111111111 : from 1,041,032,609,981-th of pi
888888888888 : from 1,141,385,905,180-th of pi
666666666666 : from 1,221,587,715,177-th of pi


Repdigits of length 9 appear 1000 times more often. That means every digit appears 2700 times in a group of 9. (a group of 10 counts lnke 2 groups of 9)
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Old 2010-01-06, 20:25   #10
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I believe the question for 9 consecutive 9's can be answered here:
http://www.research.att.com/~njas/sequences/A048940: Position 564665206.
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Old 2010-01-07, 14:32   #11
biwema
 
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Actually all sequences about consecutive digits of pi could be extended to 12 or 13 with the new calculation.

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/PiDigits.html
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