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Old 2020-09-27, 14:20   #67
PhilF
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
Something isn't right.

At the moment of birth the dog's age is undefined. A moment later the dog's age is approximately -∞. After 100 years the dog's age is ~104.
Actually, I was taught something like this is more accurate than the 7 years per 1 human year. It is 10.5 years per year for the first 2 years, then 4 years per human year after that:

https://www.onlineconversion.com/dogyears.htm
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Old 2020-09-27, 14:22   #68
Dr Sardonicus
 
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Originally Posted by MattcAnderson View Post
My dog's name is Annabelle. She was born in 2013 so that makes her 7 in human years, and 49 in dog years. She is half pit-bull and half mix. We like to go to the dog park.
<snip>
Annabelle seems to be paying close attention to what the photographer is doing.

FWIW I ran across what appears to be a better comparison between dog age and human age:

1) The first year of a dog's life is roughly equivalent to the first 21 years of a human's life.

2) Each succeeding year of a dog's life is roughly equivalent to 4 years of a human's life.

The first part of the formula reflects the fact that most dogs reach maturity in their first year of life (though some large breeds take two years). The 4-year equivalent for succeeding years makes the stages in a dog's life match stages in a human life reasonably well.

Obviously, the 7-year formula doesn't work too well for young dogs. For dogs around 5 or 6 years, the two formulas aren't far apart (they coincide at 5 years 8 months).

In your case, 7*7 = 49, 21 + 4*6 = 21 + 24 = 45. Early middle age.

The formula above seems better for old dogs.

The oldest dog I ever saw was a school friend's dog, a medium-sized black short haired dog named Patty, which I first met when my friend and I were in grade school.

Quite a few years after high school, I was visiting my friend when the most ancient-looking dog I ever saw came creaking into the room. It was, or had been black, but now with a lot of salt in that pepper. Its muzzle was completely white. Openmouthed, I asked, "Is that Patty?" It was. I asked, "How old is she? She was 21 years old. She had gone blind and almost deaf. By the seven-years formula that would be 147 years, which is well beyond any documented human longevity. By the other formula, it works out to 21 + 76 = 97 years, which seems about right.

Last fiddled with by Dr Sardonicus on 2020-09-27 at 14:25 Reason: Insert missing word
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Old 2020-09-27, 16:27   #69
xilman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
Obviously, the 7-year formula doesn't work too well for young dogs. For dogs around 5 or 6 years, the two formulas aren't far apart (they coincide at 5 years 8 months).
It doesn't work well for dogs of different sizes either. Big dogs tend to age significantly faster than small dogs.

Non-linearity is evident in the physiological ages of cats too, when measured against a human lifespan defined to be linear.

Our oldest cat, Brni, died at the age of 19 years, 5 months. That is roughly equivalent to 95 in human terms. Extreme ranges for the two species are roughly 25 and 120 respectively. Puberty, OTOH, occurs at perhaps 0.8 and 12 years respectively. The former is a multiplicative factor of roughly 5; the latter of 15.
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Old 2020-09-27, 18:22   #70
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Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Non-linearity is evident in the physiological ages of cats too, when measured against a human lifespan defined to be linear.
My sister had a black cat which lived to be 21 years old and a ginger which made it to 17. She has one now, in poor health, which she figures to be a minimum of 15. I had a calico which passed at 14. Current cat Levi is getting close to 12. He still has all of his teeth. He eats well and drinks a lot of water. He gets energy spurts where he will sail around in here like crazy. I won't worry about him too much as long as this pattern continues.
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Old 2020-09-29, 01:51   #71
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Moved from birds thread

Okay, so I learned something. Somewhere along the line I was told that to calculate "dog years" you multiply the age of the dog in calendar years by seven. There are other ways of calculating it.

My dog has wisdom whiskers. She has some white fur around her mouth. This is a sign of old age.

That is all.

Matt

Last fiddled with by Dr Sardonicus on 2020-09-30 at 13:29
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