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View Poll Results: Is "mung" a negative term and how do you say it?
Yes, it is negative and it is said the same as the "mung" bean 3 33.33%
Yes, it is negative and it rhymes with sponge 0 0%
No, it is neutral and it is said the same as the "mung" bean 1 11.11%
No, it is neutral and it rhymes with sponge 4 44.44%
No, it is not a word 1 11.11%
Voters: 9. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 2020-04-13, 18:52   #1
Uncwilly
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Default Is "mung" or "munged" a negative word in a moral sense?

I heard a discuss of the word "munged" recently. In your mind is it a negative concept? Not just inelegant, but bad.

Also, how is it pronounced?
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Old 2020-04-13, 19:01   #2
ewmayer
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[Note: this response came in before the poll portion was complete]
The only "mung" I know - outside of emperor Mung the Murciless of Flush Gordon fame, that is :) - is a "mung bean", so I'm guessing you're referring to the hackerism verb, "to munge", rhymes with "grunge". AFAICT there is not negative connotation, just perhaps the "inelegant but necessary procedure" aspect of said activity, which is perhaps reflected in the sound of said word.

Last fiddled with by Uncwilly on 2020-04-13 at 19:02
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Old 2020-04-13, 19:02   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
I heard a discuss of the word "munged" recently. In your mind is it a negative concept? Not just inelegant, but bad.

Also, how is it pronounced?
IMAO it is neither inelegant nor bad.

The root "mung" is a useful recursive ETLA --- Mung Until No Good.

A related adage is "if it aint broke, fix it until it is." I follow this advice far too often. It is standard procedure when one runs Gentoo Linux.

I pronounce it with a hard /g/, as in "ringed", "banged", "winged" and other such words which derive from a root with a terminal hard /g/.

Last fiddled with by xilman on 2020-04-13 at 19:04
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Old 2020-04-13, 19:05   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer View Post
[Note: this response came in before the poll portion was complete]
The only "mung" I know - outside of emperor Mung the Murciless of Flush Gordon fame, that is :) - is a "mung bean", so I'm guessing you're referring to the hackerism verb, "to munge", rhymes with "grunge". AFAICT there is not negative connotation, just perhaps the "inelegant but necessary procedure" aspect of said activity, which is perhaps reflected in the sound of said word.
The term is not "munge" but "mung". I believe that "munge" is a back-formation from "munged".

Last fiddled with by xilman on 2020-04-13 at 19:09
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Old 2020-04-13, 19:10   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
The term is not "munge" but "mung". I believe that "munge" is a back-formation from "munged".
But may be wrong. See

http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/M/mung.html
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Old 2020-04-13, 19:22   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Forget "authorities", this what you natively feel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Humpty Dumpty
When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.
We are the masters of language not the slaves to it.
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Old 2020-04-13, 20:36   #7
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On a related note, the Dutch word "modder" means mud.
This inevitably colours our perception of the English word "moderation".
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Old 2020-04-13, 21:09   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick View Post
On a related note, the Dutch word "modder" means mud.
This inevitably colours our perception of the English word "moderation".
The famous 1940s/50s US comedic duo Abbott and Costello had a famous "mudders and fodders" sketch in which Lou (Costello), naive as always, gets conned into buying a horse from the city's Department of Street Cleaning, believing it to be a bargain-priced thoroughbred race horse. Lou asks his sophisticated buddy Abbott "what does a horse eat?", and Abbott replies "why, a horse eats his fodder, of course" and Lou hears "eats his father". Abbott further explains that it's especially important for every mudder (= horse which runs well in rainy, muddy-track conditions) to eat his fodder, Costello hears "mother", and hilarity ensues.
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Old 2020-04-14, 05:13   #9
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In Romanian, we have the verb "mânji", pronounced similat to munge, with the translation(s) (according to google): "to defile, to sully, to stain, to daub, to blur, to foul, to soil, to grime, to smirch, to besmirch, to mess, to besmear, to bedaub". Maybe some connections? (didn't look for etymology).
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Old 2020-04-14, 05:18   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
Forget "authorities", this what you natively feel.

We are the masters of language not the slaves to it.
Yes. This. Agree. Absolutely. Correct.

Languages are tools, like a hammer is a tool. So you can hit people over the head with it anytime they make a missteak.
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Old 2020-04-14, 14:11   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retina View Post
Languages are tools, like a hammer is a tool. So you can hit people over the head with it anytime they make a missteak.
We have needs for words that previously didn't exist, so we create them. English hasn't had a word (at least for centuries) that means specifically nieces and nephews collectively. So people have started to use the word "niblings" (taking the common 'n' from niece and nephew, and sticking that on instead of the 's' in siblings). The term 'cousins', could be (and has been) used, but is not specific.

(This doesn't mean that I don't help people who unwittingly make an error in words.)
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