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Old 2021-05-18, 01:30   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvang View Post
<snip>
I'll be planting along the south side of the house which always gets lots of sun (very hot in summer), the drainage here is poor so whenever it rains the ground is soggy for days afterwards, and I believe our soil around here has a lot of clay in it.
<snip>
If the drainage is poor in that particular area mainly due to compacted clay soil, you might want to consider reshaping the surface and/or amending the soil (plenty of organic matter and perhaps some sand). You want water to drain away from structures and away from ornamental trees.
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Old 2021-05-18, 19:07   #79
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In the spirit of the revival of this thread, I come bearing bamboo-related questions! I've just cleared out some dying rose bushes on the side of our house and Mike wants me to put something there to replace them; he mentioned bamboo and now I've gone on a spree of research.

It seems that a running bamboo isn't out of the question if we put a liner in place as xilman mentioned, but a clumping variety would likely be the most convenient as far as maintenance. River cane (Arundinaria gigantea) is native to this general area which would be cool but I don't think the conditions are wet enough for it or its smaller sibling to grow properly (Arkansas Delta but not near a body of water, USDA Zone 7-8). Some kind of Fargesia would be perfect but I think it's too hot and wet for those species. I think the conditions here are similar to where many species of Phyllostachys are native to/thrive in, but they'd probably get too big.

I'll be planting along the south side of the house which always gets lots of sun (very hot in summer), the drainage here is poor so whenever it rains the ground is soggy for days afterwards, and I believe our soil around here has a lot of clay in it. My mom would prefer it stay on the short side, so maybe no more than 15-20 feet tall (I don't know if there's a way to limit vertical height)? She does eat bamboo shoots sometimes so a tasty variety would be a plus. Are there any bamboos that sound perfect for this environment/situation?
I need to research the matter more before commenting further. Prior to that, Phyllostachis species sound like a good bet but, as you mention, you will need to find a way of keeping them under control.

AFAIK most clumping versions are not worth eating.

Limiting vertical height is utterly trivial, but you have to wait until the desired height is reached by any particular culm. Hint: secateurs.
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Old 2021-05-18, 20:25   #80
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Hint: secateurs.
We'd been hoping for a solution using lasers at least!
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Old 2021-05-19, 01:34   #81
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Limiting vertical height is utterly trivial, but you have to wait until the desired height is reached by any particular culm. Hint: secateurs.
Maintaining the stated limitation of 15-20 feet with pruning shears (or even loppers) might be difficult unless you can reach out from a second-story window or roof.

You could probably maintain such a height from the ground with the snipper on a pole pruner, though.
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Old 2021-05-19, 06:50   #82
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Maintaining the stated limitation of 15-20 feet with pruning shears (or even loppers) might be difficult unless you can reach out from a second-story window or roof.

You could probably maintain such a height from the ground with the snipper on a pole pruner, though.


The species with which I am familiar have stems flexible enough for their tips to be bent almost down to ground level. The algorithm should now be easy to see.

For each culm which is too high, estimate by how much, find out which one it is near the ground, bend it down and snip off the excess.

Works for me.

Last fiddled with by xilman on 2021-05-19 at 06:51 Reason: punctuation.
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Old 2021-05-22, 00:55   #83
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So I spoke with a professional plant guardian. After ruling out the nuclear option, they suggested ascetic acid. Using as concentrate as possible, spray it on the plants. Is not the chemical burn, rather the desiccation that is the goal. I have acquired some 30% (at the local emporium of construction, sold as a cleaner) and put a few drops of a grease cutting dishsoap in i~800 mL. I have made an initial application of different degrees on different parts of the infestation. I will monitor the results. I also have about 4L of 5%.
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Old 2021-05-22, 08:20   #84
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So I spoke with a professional plant guardian. After ruling out the nuclear option, they suggested ascetic acid. Using as concentrate as possible, spray it on the plants. Is not the chemical burn, rather the desiccation that is the goal. I have acquired some 30% (at the local emporium of construction, sold as a cleaner) and put a few drops of a grease cutting dishsoap in i~800 mL. I have made an initial application of different degrees on different parts of the infestation. I will monitor the results. I also have about 4L of 5%.
Good luck.

I suspect that it will take 2-4 years to kill the plant completely. Much of its resources are underground, where it has ample access to water. Eventually it will be the lack of photosynthetic sugars which will kill it.

Cutting off each and every shoot as soon as it appears is likely to be just as effective.
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Old 2021-05-28, 16:17   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
I need to prevent bamboo from growing in some areas.
Have you tried buying** a Panda?
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Old 2021-05-28, 16:42   #86
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Have you tried buying** a Panda?
My Phyllostachys violascens is now officially a crop. The new shoots are delicious and harvesting them each spring will keep the main plant under control.

Still no word from Uncwilly as to the species with which he has issues or whether he could treat it likewise.
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Old 2021-05-28, 16:56   #87
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Quote:
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Have you tried buying** a Panda?
That does not prevent the dread plant from growing.
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Old 2021-05-28, 18:02   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncwilly View Post
That does not prevent the dread plant from growing.
No, but the panda will enjoy eating it and, and he will be happy. That was a joke anyhow. I bet the most people here didn't know that you can't, actually, buy a panda. You can only rent one. That's why the stars after buy. All pandas in the world (with very rare exception, mostly illegal) are Chinese gov property and you can not buy one. If you have a zoo and prove you can create conditions, they will lend you a family, and if they prove naughty and have any offspring, the offspring is still "Chinese citizen". When you don't need them anymore, you return them to mamma-China. In few parts of the world, "buying a panda" is synonym to doing something very illegal, or outrageous, or stupid.

We also didn't know that, until Chiang Mai started their panda-adventure in 2003. For about 15 (wiki is a lot outdated) years there was a panda-craziness here, which you can google about, as the local zoo brought in a pair, then the pair had a baby, they built a huge "refrigerator" for them (too hot here, they would succumb in days), people paid VERY expensive tickets to go and stay half hour in the refrigerator and see panda doing absolutely nothing, not mentioning queuing for hours in the sun to enter there, and max craziness, few people even paid large sums of money to have their "panda plates" for cars (which are now obsolete since 2019 or so, I have seen the new "luxury" and "eco" plates have no pandas on them anymore, just rice fields, and other things which are "representative" for CM area or city).

Last fiddled with by LaurV on 2021-05-29 at 02:09
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