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Old 2020-09-25, 00:13   #45
Dr Sardonicus
 
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This Monarch caterpillar looked to be almost ready to pupate. Then it fell victim to another insect, the Wheel Bug (Arilus cristatus), which gets its common name from the distinctive serrated ridge on its back. This looks vaguely like part of the edge of a wheel or gear.
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Old 2020-09-25, 19:44   #46
tuckerkao
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
Insects are good eating if they are prepared properly.
Dandelions can be prepared for the meals during the recession time as well. The insect meat taste nicely with the dandelion salad.

Last fiddled with by tuckerkao on 2020-09-25 at 19:45
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Old 2020-09-27, 05:26   #47
kladner
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
This Monarch caterpillar looked to be almost ready to pupate. Then it fell victim to another insect, the Wheel Bug (Arilus cristatus), which gets its common name from the distinctive serrated ridge on its back. This looks vaguely like part of the edge of a wheel or gear.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheel_bug
Fascinating! I had never even heard of them.
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Old 2020-10-24, 00:28   #48
Dr Sardonicus
 
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Washington state discovers first 'murder hornet' nest in US
Quote:
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Scientists in Washington state have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials said.

Workers with the state Agriculture Department spent weeks searching, trapping and using dental floss to tie tracking devices to Asian giant hornets, which can deliver painful stings to people and spit venom but are the biggest threat to honeybees that farmers depend on to pollinate crops.
<snip>
The nest was found after an Agriculture Department worker trapped two of the hornets Wednesday. Two more were captured Thursday, the agency said.

Using dental floss, "entomologists were able to attach radio trackers to three hornets, the second of which led them to the discovery of the nest" Thursday, agriculture officials said.
In other insect news, the two Monarch Butterfly chrysalises I'd had on my milkweed both perished a while back. One of them started to turn black soon after apparently being jabbed by a stink bug. This seemed strange -- I had thought of stink bugs as plant pests. A bit of research turned up a predatory stink bug, however, the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris. This species does attack caterpillars, but I was unable to find any mention of predation of chrysalises. The other chrysalis started to blacken the same way a day or two later.

Even if the adults had emerged, it is unlikely they would have survived. By the time they would have been expected to emerge, most of the flowers were gone, and the weather was turning cool. If it's below 60 F (16 C) they can't fly.

There's just one thing to do: Plant more milkweed!
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