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Old 2021-05-13, 12:33   #4313
Uncwilly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xyzzy View Post
Naked link with no explanation of what it is. What make you go Hmm?
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Old 2021-05-17, 11:58   #4314
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https://www.bbc.com/news/57102499
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Old 2021-05-19, 16:35   #4315
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https://apnews.com/article/alaska-bu...5bc329609bedf3

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JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy proposed $5 million in funding for a farming project spanning 156 square miles (404 square kilometers), the largest the state has seen in decades.
<snip>
The project could begin west of the central Alaska town of Nenana as early as fall 2022. If approved and fully developed, it would be the largest state-funded agricultural venture in Alaska since the failed Delta Barley Project of the 1970s and 1980s.
<snip>
The project would be a step toward accomplishing self-reliance for the state, something the Republican Dunleavy has promoted as among his goals.
<snip>
Unless he's planning on building greenhouses on a massive scale, this might prove difficult. Alaska is generally unsuited to abundant field crops of food items.

According to the September 2020 USDA Alaska Farm Reporter, in 2019 and 2020, Alaska had 6,000 acres planted in barley, and harvested 5,000 acres, with yields of 38 and 43 bushels per acre, among the lowest of any state. (Kansas, Michigan, and Wisconsin have comparably low barley yields.) The report does not indicate wheat or oats being grown as grain crops.

For the benefit of those blessedly unfamiliar with US length and area units, a square mile is 640 acres. Thus, 10 square miles is 6400 acres, more than the current acreage Alaska has planted in barley, but far less than the size of the proposed project.
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Old 2021-06-04, 11:21   #4316
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https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-57345703
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Old 2021-06-04, 12:27   #4317
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
https://apnews.com/article/alaska-bu...5bc329609bedf3

Unless he's planning on building greenhouses on a massive scale, this might prove difficult. Alaska is generally unsuited to abundant field crops of food items.

According to the September 2020 USDA Alaska Farm Reporter, in 2019 and 2020, Alaska had 6,000 acres planted in barley, and harvested 5,000 acres, with yields of 38 and 43 bushels per acre, among the lowest of any state. (Kansas, Michigan, and Wisconsin have comparably low barley yields.) The report does not indicate wheat or oats being grown as grain crops.

For the benefit of those blessedly unfamiliar with US length and area units, a square mile is 640 acres. Thus, 10 square miles is 6400 acres, more than the current acreage Alaska has planted in barley, but far less than the size of the proposed project.
I wonder why they don't grow winter wheat? Perhaps even with the "head start" winter wheat has come spring the growing season is still too short or the soil is not the right type? It could also be an infrastructure problem ( harvesting, storing, shipping ).

To save you a google: winter wheat is sown in autumn and becomes small plants by winter. These small plants are hardy enough to survive the cold until they resume growing upon the arrival of warm weather.
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Old 2021-06-04, 12:51   #4318
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Originally Posted by tServo View Post
I wonder why they don't grow winter wheat? Perhaps even with the "head start" winter wheat has come spring the growing season is still too short or the soil is not the right type? It could also be an infrastructure problem ( harvesting, storing, shipping ).

To save you a google: winter wheat is sown in autumn and becomes small plants by winter. These small plants are hardy enough to survive the cold until they resume growing upon the arrival of warm weather.
They've tried. It's really, really iffy. It tends to rot.
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