mersenneforum.org  

Go Back   mersenneforum.org > Fun Stuff > Lounge

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 2020-04-17, 17:47   #210
xilman
Bamboozled!
 
xilman's Avatar
 
"𒉺𒌌𒇷𒆷𒀭"
May 2003
Down not across

240168 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xyzzy View Post
Legally we can't try, but we are interested
Ditto.

It might, or might not, be the case that I've tried other substances.

What I can say is that nicotine does almost nothing for me, that caffeine gives an interesting high but only in doses which are probably harmful. Ethanol is addictive but interesting and worth experiencing IMO.

Capsaicin is not addictive, though undoubtedly habit-forming, and generates a powerful endorphin high in me. The only deleterious side-effect, AFAICT, is that prolonged (many years) high doses can damage the digestive tract and lead to ulcers. That said, it is also a powerful vermifuge --- which could prove valuable in some circumstances.

I know that I've already posted my chilli con coction recipe in the relevant thread but can't now remember (amnesia is a common side-effect of the over usse of ethanol) whether spaghetti aglio olio e peperoncino has been given the equivalent treatment.
xilman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-05-04, 12:14   #211
Dr Sardonicus
 
Dr Sardonicus's Avatar
 
Feb 2017
Nowhere

23·151 Posts
Default Happy Star Wars Day!

Martin Luther King's traffic ticket changed history's course
Quote:
DECATUR, Ga. (AP) — On this day 60 years ago, a black man driving a white woman was pulled over in a traffic stop that would change the course of American history.

The incident was unknown to most at the time and has been largely forgotten. The man was Martin Luther King Jr., and his citation on May 4, 1960, led to him being sentenced, illegally, to a chain gang.
<snip>
The AP reported on Oct. 25, 1960, that over 300 people crowded into the Decatur courtroom to watch Judge J. Oscar Mitchell sentence King to four months, even though King's Alabama license was valid until 1962.

"I watched in horror as Martin was immediately taken from the courtroom, his hands in metal cuffs behind his back," Coretta Scott King recalled in her autobiography. "Martin later told me that the terrors of southern justice, wherein scores of black men were plucked from their cells and never seen again, ran through his mind."

King urged his wife to be strong in a letter from a Georgia prison. Three years before "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," he wrote: "this is the cross that we must bear for the freedom of our people."

With days left in the race, the campaigns of Richard M. Nixon and John F. Kennedy sought to downplay civil rights issues for fear of losing southern white votes.

Blacks had mostly voted Republican, since Abraham Lincoln. Nixon had just been endorsed by Martin Luther King Sr., the leader of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

But Nixon ignored their pleas for help, while Kennedy called Coretta to express his sympathy.

Historians Taylor Branch and David Garrow wrote that Robert F. Kennedy threw a fit, telling aides who fed her number to his brother that they cost him the presidency, but he called Mitchell, who reversed his denial of bond, immediately freeing King.

King's father switched his endorsement, saying Kennedy had "the moral courage to stand up for what's right." That quote, and others, appeared in a blue-papered pamphlet titled "No Comment Nixon Versus a Candidate with a Heart, Senator Kennedy." Unnoticed by the national media, Kennedy aides and King supporters distributed the pamphlet in black churches around the nation the Sunday before Election Day.

Blacks had voted 60-40 Republican just four years earlier; this time they voted 70-30 for the Democrat, providing more than enough for Kennedy to win the electoral college and the popular vote by a narrow 113,000 margin nationwide, according to Theodore H. White in "The Making of the Presidency 1960."
<snip>
Dr Sardonicus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-05-04, 20:14   #212
ewmayer
2ω=0
 
ewmayer's Avatar
 
Sep 2002
República de California

2·13·443 Posts
Default

May 4, 2020 is also 50th anniversary of US National Guard troops shooting and killing 4 student Vietnam War protesters at Kent State University in Ohio, a little over 2 years after MLK was assassinated.
ewmayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-05-05, 02:56   #213
kladner
 
kladner's Avatar
 
"Kieren"
Jul 2011
In My Own Galaxy!

32·11·101 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer View Post
May 4, 2020 is also 50th anniversary of US National Guard troops shooting and killing 4 student Vietnam War protesters at Kent State University in Ohio, a little over 2 years after MLK was assassinated.
Kent State Shootings: A Lot of People Were Crying, and the Guard Walked Away
https://www.rollingstone.com/culture...4-1970-992983/

Devo’s Jerry Casale Looks Back at Kent State 50 Years Later: ‘Time Stood Still’
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...rotest-992651/
kladner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-05-05, 07:03   #214
Nick
 
Nick's Avatar
 
Dec 2012
The Netherlands

25·32·5 Posts
Default

75 years ago today, the Netherlands was liberated from Nazi occupation.
It's also going to be the strangest Liberation Day celebration in all that time
because of the current corona virus restrictions.
Nick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-08-06, 12:09   #215
Xyzzy
 
Xyzzy's Avatar
 
"Mike"
Aug 2002

7,703 Posts
Default

Hiroshima bomb: Japan marks 75 years since nuclear attack

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-53660059
Xyzzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-08-06, 22:02   #216
ewmayer
2ω=0
 
ewmayer's Avatar
 
Sep 2002
República de California

2·13·443 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xyzzy View Post
Hiroshima bomb: Japan marks 75 years since nuclear attack

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-53660059
Being a numbers & physics nerd, I can't resist: It's an interesting exercise to work backward from the estimated explosive yield and calculate just what % of the Hiroshima bomb's crude gun-type supercriticality design's incredibly-expensive-to-obtain U235 fissioned , and to compare that "explosive efficiency" to that of the Nagasaki Pu-implosion bomb a few days later. (Yah, you can find it on Wikipedia, but where's the fun?)
ewmayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-08-07, 16:37   #217
tServo
 
tServo's Avatar
 
"Marv"
May 2009
near the Tannhäuser Gate

11×47 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer View Post
Being a numbers & physics nerd, I can't resist: It's an interesting exercise to work backward from the estimated explosive yield and calculate just what % of the Hiroshima bomb's crude gun-type supercriticality design's incredibly-expensive-to-obtain U235 fissioned , and to compare that "explosive efficiency" to that of the Nagasaki Pu-implosion bomb a few days later. (Yah, you can find it on Wikipedia, but where's the fun?)
I read this amazing stat in the excellent Richard Rhodes book:
The first orientation meeting for newly arrived scientists at Los Alamos was held April, 1943.
A mere 27 months later was the Trinity test !!!!
One must also remember that the original design for the plutonium bomb was abandoned and they had to start over.
tServo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-08-07, 16:40   #218
Xyzzy
 
Xyzzy's Avatar
 
"Mike"
Aug 2002

7,703 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ewmayer View Post
…incredibly-expensive-to-obtain U235…
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...he-atomic-bomb
Xyzzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-08-07, 17:02   #219
Till
 
Till's Avatar
 
"Tilman Neumann"
Jan 2016
Germany

1A216 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xyzzy View Post

Fascinating article!
Till is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2020-08-07, 20:35   #220
ewmayer
2ω=0
 
ewmayer's Avatar
 
Sep 2002
República de California

101100111111102 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xyzzy View Post
Yes, Shinkolobwe, what an amazing concentration of Uranium - better ores there 65% pure U, and even the "tailings" are 20% U! The concentration was such that parts of the mine acted as natural nuclear reactors in the geologic past.
Quote:
In a deal with Union Minière – negotiated by the British, who owned a 30% interest in the company – the US secured 1,200 tonnes of Congolese uranium, which was stockpiled on Staten Island, US, and an additional 3,000 tonnes that was stored above ground at the mine in Shinkolobwe. But it was not enough. US Army engineers were dispatched to drain the mine, which had fallen into disuse, and bring it back into production.
"It was not enough" - only in the context of insisting on a crude "safe design" using U235 slugs, as ended up being used just once due to its extreme inefficiency, at Hiroshima. If they hadn't been able to secure the above naturally-high-enriched stockpile, they would've simply been forced to make the Pu-implosion bomb the main line or research - a much smaller amount of modest (20% or less) enriched U in a reactor yields Pu, which - unlike the expensive isotopic U235/U238 separation - can be *chemically* separated from the burned enriched-U slugs. But given the big Shinkolobwe haul they had the luxury of a dual-track, and once they'd spent all that time and money building the cruder gun-type weapon, might as well use it, right? After the twin bombings, the remaining U235 was repurposed into implosion bomb cores.

Also, the article makes it sound like Einstein discovered the potential of Uranium:
Quote:
It was only when nuclear fission was discovered in 1938 that the potential of uranium became apparent. After hearing about the discovery, Albert Einstein immediately wrote to US president Franklin D Roosevelt, advising him that the element could be used to generate a colossal amount of energy – even to construct powerful bombs.
I hate such later hagiography where the role of the actual other 'lesser' scientists who made the discoveries get written out in favor of the Big Names. In this case, Joliot-Curie, Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard, who approached the by-then-elder-statesman Einstein because they figured someone of his stature would be more likely to catch the president's ear. From the actual letter:
Quote:
Some recent work by E. Fermi and L. Szilard, which has been communicated to me in manuscript, leads me to expect that the element uranium may be turned into a new and important source of energy in the immediate future. Certain aspects of the situation which has arisen seem to call for watchfulness and if necessary, quick action on the part of the Administration. I believe therefore that it is my duty to bring to your attention the following facts and recommendations.

In the course of the last four months it has been made probable through the work of Joliot in France as well as Fermi and Szilard in America--that it may be possible to set up a nuclear chain reaction in a large mass of uranium, by which vast amounts of power and large quantities of new radium-like elements would be generated. Now it appears almost certain that this could be achieved in the immediate future...
But fascinating colonial-exploitation and cold war history, in any event.

Last fiddled with by ewmayer on 2020-08-07 at 20:37
ewmayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Official "Faits erronés dans de belles-lettres" thread ewmayer Lounge 39 2015-05-19 01:08
Official "all-Greek-to-me Fiction Literature and Cinema" Thread ewmayer Science & Technology 41 2014-04-16 11:54
Official "Lasciate ogne speranza" whinge-thread cheesehead Soap Box 56 2013-06-29 01:42
Official "Ernst is a deceiving bully and George is a meanie" thread cheesehead Soap Box 61 2013-06-11 04:30
Official "String copy Statement Considered Harmful" thread Dubslow Programming 19 2012-05-31 17:49

All times are UTC. The time now is 02:09.

Sat Sep 26 02:09:37 UTC 2020 up 15 days, 23:20, 0 users, load averages: 1.27, 1.32, 1.56

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

This forum has received and complied with 0 (zero) government requests for information.

Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation.
A copy of the license is included in the FAQ.