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Old 2014-10-23, 22:24   #1
Primeinator
 
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"Kyle"
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Default Adding second CPU to mainboard

Hello all you tech savvy members of the forum-

I have a quick question regarding the addition of a second CPU to my desktop computer. I know nothing about this process or if I can even do it with my current setup. I would be interested in adding a hex core or perhaps a fancy new eight-core CPU if it is compatible with the motherboard (also depending upon cost). My system is liquid cooled (would this need to be adjusted if another CPU were added or would the hosing cover both CPUs?).

My current CPU is Intel i7 3820
My motherboard is X79A-GD45 Plus (MS-7760)

I am running Windows 8 64 bit
I have 16 GB of DDR3
GPU is NVIDIA GeForce GT 620

Any help and guidance is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 2014-10-23, 22:59   #2
kladner
 
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http://us.msi.com/product/mb/X79AGD4...#hero-overview

Beggin' yer pardon, Guv, that's a single socket board. Are you saying you want to upgrade the CPU?
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Old 2014-10-23, 23:00   #3
TheMawn
 
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A quick search for that motherboard shows that it only has one CPU slot (the big thing in the middle). You cannot add a second CPU to this motherboard. Only a very specific few have this capacity (and they're more expensive).

Additionally, your current CPU is an i7-3XXX and the CPU you're thinking about is an i7-5XXX so it would definitely not fit even if you DID have a dual-CPU motherboard.
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Old 2014-10-23, 23:05   #4
kladner
 
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Default dual socket boards

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131643

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Z9PED8_WS/

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131817
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Old 2014-10-23, 23:07   #5
Primeinator
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kladner View Post
http://us.msi.com/product/mb/X79AGD4...#hero-overview

Beggin' yer pardon, Guv, that's a single socket board. Are you saying you want to upgrade the CPU?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMawn View Post
A quick search for that motherboard shows that it only has one CPU slot (the big thing in the middle). You cannot add a second CPU to this motherboard. Only a very specific few have this capacity (and they're more expensive).

Additionally, your current CPU is an i7-3XXX and the CPU you're thinking about is an i7-5XXX so it would definitely not fit even if you DID have a dual-CPU motherboard.
Ah. Bummer. I was not aware it was only a single-socket board.

I wonder what would be less expensive in the long run- adding a second motherboard that has multiple sockets... or upgrading the board and CPU with the ability to add a second and/or third CPU later. I know my "tower" is quite large but as I have already demonstrated I am clearly ignorant on how these things work.
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Old 2014-10-24, 00:42   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Primeinator View Post
Ah. Bummer. I was not aware it was only a single-socket board.

I wonder what would be less expensive in the long run- adding a second motherboard that has multiple sockets... or upgrading the board and CPU with the ability to add a second and/or third CPU later. I know my "tower" is quite large but as I have already demonstrated I am clearly ignorant on how these things work.
It's cheapest to have multiple computers. CPUs that support multiprocessor setups are far more expensive, too, not just the motherboards. If you want a really beefy single processor computer, look for a X99/Haswell-E setup.
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Old 2014-10-24, 01:30   #7
Primeinator
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Rose View Post
It's cheapest to have multiple computers. CPUs that support multiprocessor setups are far more expensive, too, not just the motherboards. If you want a really beefy single processor computer, look for a X99/Haswell-E setup.
Okay. Interesting.
This is my tower:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...zHgxoCjt3w_wcB

It sounds like it only supports Micro ATX ad Standard ATX boards... so I assume that if I want to eventually upgrade my board and processor I will need a different case?
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Old 2014-10-24, 01:40   #8
VBCurtis
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Primeinator View Post
Okay. Interesting.
This is my tower:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...zHgxoCjt3w_wcB

It sounds like it only supports Micro ATX ad Standard ATX boards... so I assume that if I want to eventually upgrade my board and processor I will need a different case?
upgrade your board to... what? Nearly every mainstream desktop board will fit fine in an ATX case. If you are dead-set on a two-socket board, you are building a server, and will need server components- case, memory, power supply, CPUs, etc. You're talking 2-3 times the expense of building two separate machines for the convenience and power of having all the CPU on a single OS. The server market expects high levels of reliability, much higher than the desktop market; this reliability comes at great expense. Browse pricewatch.com; you can spec server boards, CPUs, memory, etc. It's not pretty.

If math projects are your thing, a single server-type machine is a sizable waste of money compared to two separate desktops. You can use a kvm switch to run them from a single keyboard/video monitor/mouse (see, kvm?). Also, you get the joy of staggered upgrading- perhaps a new regular desktop every 2 yrs instead of waiting 4 yrs to upgrade the big iron.

There are certainly tasks that really benefit from more than 6 cores- thus, the server market. The matrix-solving step of NFS factoring for really big projects is such a task; user fivemack built a 48-core Athlon server for just that purpose.
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Old 2014-10-24, 17:50   #9
Primeinator
 
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Okay. Thank you for your patience. Obviously I have a lot to learn about such things.

Eventually I'll get it figured out the best way run a large number of simultaneous LL tests in the most cost efficient matter.
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Old 2014-10-24, 20:45   #10
henryzz
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In some cases you might be able to justify buying a server system with more than one socket based on power consumption. A two socket system will use less than 2 one socket systems. That could easily take a few years though and upgrading the pc might be better. Space is another factor that can be considered.
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Old 2014-10-24, 21:08   #11
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I'm now a bit ambivalent about big servers. I'm still very happy with the 48-core machine, but I'm not using it for linear algebra very much.

The problem is that linear algebra doesn't scale linearly with the number of cores, whilst the amount of sieving work that I'm missing out on by using the cores for linear algebra does; linear algebra on all 48 cores of the Opteron is about the same speed as on six cores of an i7/4930K. Which is odd since the Opteron ought to have about four times the memory bandwidth of the Ivy Bridge.

Of course the Opteron's cores aren't as fast as contemporary ones, but quantity has a quality all its own:

31861s median runtime on one core K10/1900MHz = average 130 blocks a day
17162s median runtime on one thread i7/4770 (3700MHz max turbo with four cores active) = average 40 blocks a day

On a third hand, that's 130 blocks a day from a machine that uses 550W and cost £4344
40 blocks a day from a machine that uses 120W and cost £602.38

So if I were perfectly rational I might well sell the big machine to someone who had a use for it and could pay me £1500, spend £2000 on three Haswell boxes (I'd be quite tempted by the Gigabyte Brix boxes with i7/4770R CPUs and 128MB L4 cache), and break even after three years using 190W less electricity. It would be a little annoying to distribute jobs over Haswell boxes, but only a little.

On a fourth hand I'd be a little tempted by a single big Haswell Xeon machine - two 8-core E5/2640v3 and 64GB memory costs about £2800 (£1450 CPUs, £650 RAM, £400 motherboard, £100 SSD, £300 case+PSU+heat sinks), will use probably 300W, and assuming everything runs at max turbo (2.8GHz with eight cores active) I'd expect a median runtime of about 23000s and 120 blocks a day. So it's £200 more than a pile of four Haswell boxes which would run 30% faster; I might be willing to pay that much for a machine which can run a single 50GB job if necessary, and which is a much easier thing to manage.

Last fiddled with by fivemack on 2014-10-24 at 21:30
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