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Old 2021-02-02, 13:01   #128
MJansen
 
Jan 2018

43 Posts
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Hi Seth and Bobby,

when you plot the remaining candidates of a primorial value divided by 6, 30, 210, 2310 etc. you will find the remaining candidates with divider 6 are few close to the primorial center value but many a little distance from the center. The larger the divider, the more spread out the candidates are.

So in a nutshell: The larger the divider, the fewer there are candidates around the center.
But since the remaining candidates (say with divider 30030), are stronger candidates, chance is you will mostly find smaller gaps with the occasional find of a larger gap.

There has been a post somewhere/somewhen that had a very nice graphic representation of that observation.
You can easily check this yourself by writing a simple script that for instance prints the remaining candidates in an interval p(100)#/D +/- 10*P(100). after deleting all candidates that divide by the factors of the divider D.
So D = 30030 has factors 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13 --> remove all candidates that can be divided by one (or more) of these factors
So D = 30 had factors 2, 3, 5 --> remove all candidates that can be divided by one (or more) of these factors

Compare the distribution of the candidates and you will see the pattern emerge, as I described above.

Hope this is clear
Michiel

Last fiddled with by MJansen on 2021-02-02 at 13:08
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