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Old 2021-06-23, 16:05   #7
mart_r
 
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Dec 2008
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Here's the updated table 7 for you, including the Pari program where I previously forgot to adjust the variable names to the text.

And here's a decuplet too: (193,057th prime of s = 289) * 1,889 + {220, 238, 378, 624, 934, 1048, 1414, 1612, 1678, 1750}
where the 193,057th prime of s = 289 is
Code:
31622342567119297681076089891955816714567540280951897365387154057445488363818198016103621097928354615483039036120985961432365652251514164595044179903724253210032238290899811114046504503777054229122725692603678959245884842428958171279396512793345739562301201289205906157466250260424464347285786720763386343358970437066090084387214846787188810038323800022249321968498343734757162251150197635271251591141913929920578564323411668207833015231803312413278100502072679946962206773893320130362397698036981816468531752935920178488432680654626988222331983116303339502122373584059843024086090134096811878534903483185031614489646009414820924548284793618591561552678558457275689527829154639089241831525443509583812990724843963675707936160940952072970697432023165485601359791369860896277765474897467473349879301
Yay! *Throws up a single confetti* Or is that called a confetto?
Oh! Look at how the number starts off... wait... contfrac((log(a)/log(10)) = 796; 2, 41939, 2, 101, 1, 7, ... - nice!

Now at p=1931... but, you know, the year 1931 was not an especially nice one in terms of history. I'll continue to crunch the numbers down. I am unstoppable!!

You know, it only recently occured to me that those numbers have a subtle crude sense of humour, looking at the point where the first sextuplet appears.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Table_7.pdf (69.5 KB, 89 views)
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