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Old 2021-06-02, 22:56   #96
jvang
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"Joey"
Nov 2015
Middle of Nowhere,AR

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Sardonicus View Post
If the drainage is poor in that particular area mainly due to compacted clay soil, you might want to consider reshaping the surface and/or amending the soil (plenty of organic matter and perhaps some sand). You want water to drain away from structures and away from ornamental trees.
Unfortunately this is kinda just a result of the area in which we live. Very flat land with no proper drainage. Plus we're near the bottom of a local ridge that has a lot of runoff during big rainstorms...

It could be a good idea to mess with the soil though! I'm not sure how I would be able to find out what the current composition is but perhaps I could just replace a large portion of it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by xilman View Post
I need to research the matter more before commenting further. Prior to that, Phyllostachis species sound like a good bet but, as you mention, you will need to find a way of keeping them under control.

AFAIK most clumping versions are not worth eating.

Limiting vertical height is utterly trivial, but you have to wait until the desired height is reached by any particular culm. Hint: secateurs.
Have you heard of this barrier material before? It claims to be specifically designed for keeping bamboo contained: https://bambooshield.com/products/ba...ick-x-24-depth

In my research I found a nice looking site that seems to have a lot of useful information: https://www.gardenia.net/compare-plants/bamboos

I punched in the following parameters: Hardiness zones 7 and 8, and Full Sun. This brought up a few Fargesia varieties and many Phyllostachys. In particular, this one looks like a perfect match: https://www.gardenia.net/plant/fargesia-rufa

It matches the temperature range of our area, it fares decently in a lot of sunlight (will be planted on the south side of the house), it likes wet soil, and it may like the type of soil found here (lots of clay content). Plus, it's a clumping variety so no barrier would be needed. Not likely to be very edible but that's not a big deal. Any thoughts?
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