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-   -   Reserved for MF - Sequence 4788 (https://www.mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=11615)

akruppa 2012-04-10 07:18

Started NFS even though it could use a bit more ECM. Let's see who finishes first.

Dubslow 2012-04-10 07:18

[QUOTE=Batalov;295998]Neat. As luck has it. (I had 3800 11e6s on it already ATM.)
Now a little one? [strike]C116?[/strike] C113? :-)[/QUOTE]

I set it factor(C142), ECM found the P29, and YAFU's already started GNFS on the C113, so I'll let it crunch.
Edit: I'd estimate a few hours tops, maybe even less than 1 hr, but it's late; we'll see.
[code]<poly select> aprogs: 2511 entries, 3391 roots
hashtable: 4096 entries, 0.06 MB
coeff 10212 specialq 1 - 3943 other 6499 - 15597
aprogs: 1030 entries, 1358 roots
hashtable: 1024 entries, 0.02 MB
coeff 10212 specialq 1 - 684 other 15597 - 37432
aprogs: 2427 entries, 3235 roots
hashtable: 4096 entries, 0.06 MB
coeff 10224 specialq 1 - 3945 other 6498 - 15595
aprogs: 1064 entries, 1404 roots
hashtable: 1024 entries, 0.02 MB
coeff 10224 specialq 1 - 684 other 15595 - 37428
aprogs: 2509 entries, 3381 roots
hashtable: 4096 entries, 0.06 MB
coeff 10248 specialq 1 - 3949 other 6496 - 15590
aprogs: 1086 entries, 1570 roots
hashtable: 2048 entries, 0.03 MB
coeff 10248 specialq 1 - 685 other 15590 - 37416
aprogs: 2609 entries, 4025 roots
<snip>
nfs: commencing polynomial search over range: 11001 - 11251[/code]
It keeps spitting ~1 line/sec. The snip represents about a minute of output.

Edit: Aw crap, crost post/cross NFS. You'll have to tell me which one of us is further. I'll post when it starts sieving. (One core of a ~3.9 GHz 2600K.)

Batalov 2012-04-10 07:22

:popcorn:
[code]#free gift (a.k.a. poison):
# norm 9.458633e-11 alpha -5.536770 e 7.531e-10 rroots 5
skew: 29634.48
c0: -65184430402097431471159344
c1: 24104275333618597871334
c2: 1628340288089389017
c3: -55394166360497
c4: -1696239259
c5: 24924
Y0: -4986425138116492873961
Y1: 227709451789[/code]

Dubslow 2012-04-10 07:22

[QUOTE=Batalov;296007]My bet is on you! ...'cause you know... nobody else is running it. ;-)[/QUOTE]

We cross posted ... :razz: edit: me and akruppa cross posted.
Man, this is full of cross posting and editing. Unfortunately, I don't actually know how to pass that polynomial to yafu/ggnfs, nor if it's better than anything I've found :razz:
I was originally going to edit this to say that C105s take roughly 1100 seconds for poly select; so this'll take 1500, 1800? 20-30 mins.
[code]nfs: commencing polynomial search over range: 21001 - 21251[/code]
Edit-who-knows-which: [strike]The only two numbers close are the quintic coeff and the skew (I have no idea what that is, I'm only guessing on the coeffs.) Which does my line of code refer to?[/strike]
Edit5004: It says limit 50 CPU-seconds per coeff.
Edit5005: Whoops, I just actually read the output I copied pasted and answered my own question :blush:
EditILoveEdits!: [code]hashtable: 4096 entries, 0.06 MB
coeff [U]24924[/U] specialq 1 - 5979 other 5770 - 13848
aprogs: 916 entries, 1152 roots[/code]
Edit5007: Regarding 5005, I gotta ask, what do the others besides the coefficients mean? Which do you use to "measure how good" a poly is?
Edit0800: Jeez, how far does poly select go? I'm at 56.5K and climbing!
Edit0811: Okay, I'm going to cheat a bit. At sometime not after sieving starts, I'm putting all four cores on it.
Edit0818: 80K and climbing...

akruppa 2012-04-10 08:17

Have 1M relations so far. I estimate about 2-3 more hours of sieving.

Dubslow 2012-04-10 08:27

And in the meantime, my edit time is up, and 93K coeff and climbing... and my roommate wants bed... you win :smile:

akruppa 2012-04-10 12:24

Done

akruppa 2012-04-10 14:05

Did 1600@3M on c121, starting NFS. Feel free to do more ECM to get factors sooner.
Edit: sieving about half done, factors some time tomorrow.

akruppa 2012-04-11 11:27

Done
Edit: starting NFS on c110.

akruppa 2012-04-11 16:34

Done

Batalov 2012-04-11 16:59

i3000

akruppa 2012-04-11 17:29

Doing NFS on c99. @bsquared: Oh, good!

debrouxl 2012-04-11 17:34

600 (GMP-ECM stages 1 and 2) + 64 (GPU-ECM stage 1, GMP_ECM stage 2) @ B1=3e6 on the C99, NF.
I wanted to launch only 300 CPU curves, but I screwed up on the argument to the script...

bsquared 2012-04-11 17:44

Sorry, I did the C99.

I'm on the C118 now (actually - C98).

bsquared 2012-04-11 18:00

Done. I'll disappear back into the woodwork for awhile now. There's a easy c89 waiting for someone.

evandijk70 2012-04-11 18:02

Using B1=3000000, B2=3000000-5706890290, polynomial Dickson(6), sigma=2657438988
Step 1 took 9313ms
Step 2 took 4816ms
********** Factor found in step 2: 19361838294942830863612292556544597
Found probable prime factor of 35 digits: 19361838294942830863612292556544597
Probable prime cofactor 4474174784158986141273146393493891378884972832030329546192051603 has 64 digits

C89 now

edit: running siqs

Batalov 2012-04-11 18:13

i3010

firejuggler 2012-04-11 20:10

i3010:200@3e6

bsquared 2012-04-11 21:16

i3010:
+ 2500 @ 3e6
+ 1500 @ 11e6

Batalov 2012-04-11 21:21

+ 1500 @ 11e6

akruppa 2012-04-11 23:11

+1300@11M, P-1 1e10,1e16. Switching ECM to 44M.

jrk 2012-04-12 00:06

Isn't that enough ECM?

For the c140, the 13e siever is faster than 14e. Here's a poly:

(If RSALS wants to sieve it with 14e, then stop at Q=15M instead)
[code][color=blue]# sieve with ggnfs lasieve4 I13e on alg side from Q=5M to 26M[/color]
# est ~29M raw relations (avg. 0.029 sec/rel C2D @ 3.4GHz)
# aq4788:3010
n: 16625281901730370455071681055917159130395787481401452610520456476271085497806820213722749165335977787336736588553081897741511525160614380551
# norm 1.910642e-13 alpha -6.928618 e 2.341e-11 rroots 5
skew: 599508.87
c0: -427648226665491786635521697657856
c1: 33913973063579742417026172928
c2: 220112435082076467817398
c3: 9753763813104063
c4: -525233124596
c5: 229080
Y0: -591774861633948464998505215
Y1: 427418671945939
rlim: 7500000
alim: 15000000
lpbr: 28
lpba: 28
mfbr: 56
mfba: 56
rlambda: 2.5
alambda: 2.5
[/code]

Batalov 2012-04-12 00:09

Looks like enough ECM. Maybe
[CODE][COLOR=#0000ff]# sieve with ggnfs lasieve4 I13e on alg side from Q=5M to 26M[/COLOR]
# est ~29M raw relations (avg. 0.029 sec/rel C2D @ 3.4GHz)
# aq4788:3010
n: 16625281901730370455071681055917159130395787481401452610520456476271085497806820213722749165335977787336736588553081897741511525160614380551
type: gnfs
# norm 2.179122e-13 alpha -7.516537 e 2.538e-11 rroots 3
skew: 1228691.55
c0: -4776061894413561017372169558866655
c1: 68299881421366359321693869553
c2: -321819763373019765946931
c3: 131220470449050007
c4: 213277792786
c5: 26520
Y0: -910833582159552006771443128
Y1: 84903198921839
rlim: 7500000
alim: 15000000
lpbr: 28
lpba: 28
mfbr: 56
mfba: 56
rlambda: 2.5
alambda: 2.5[/CODE]

Dubslow 2012-04-12 02:03

How does the sec/rel rate compare across different size jobs? (On a C125 I'm doing, I'm getting about ~0.0077 sec/rel.)

And while I'm making the post, how do you compare polys? That 'e' value, which I think I've seen referred to as 'Murphy <something-or-other>"? There isn't exactly a beginner's guide to running (not completely understanding) NFS that I've found yet :razz:

(Or, how do you estimate rels required for a given size number?)

Batalov 2012-04-12 02:17

The speed will be what it will be (and on different nodes it will be different but proportional to their 'strength'). It is gauged by a small sieve with a command line like
[CODE]gnfs-lasieve4I13e -a t1.poly -f 9000000 -c 2000
gnfs-lasieve4I13e -a t2.poly -f 9000000 -c 2000
# and then repeat with different staggered -f ("from")[/CODE]

Murphy E is a rough estimation function, but a head-to-head run like above will help to decide (between a few top E-rated contenders; makes sense to bother with this only for gnfs>150, snfs>220, roughly, otherwise take the top poly by E)

For the third question, you may want to search forum and read. There are volumes written about this. Roughly, you want 46M non-redundant rels for a job with lpbr/a 29; 22M for lpbr/a 28; 92M for lpbr/a 30 - minimum; more is initially better, then becomes a waste (lost time for more sieving is not compensated by less time for the algebra).
_____________

EDIT: musing about Jayson's correct message below (a primitive explanation) Norm makes this one faster, but less productive per the work range (due to alpha), so the range does need correction. Oh, wait, you shrunk it /I would have expected it to need be extended/. Anyway, Ben will adjust as needed.

Good call B[sup]2[/sup]! Too small for RSALS and even if they did it, the job would be first in queue for a day.

jrk 2012-04-12 02:37

Batalov's poly looks good to start sieving, but the specialQ range needs changed from the previous poly it was copied from.

I calculated a specialQ range of 5M to 24M for Batalov's poly, using siever 13e.

bsquared 2012-04-12 02:39

[QUOTE=jrk;296196]Batalov's poly looks good to start sieving, but the specialQ range needs changed from the previous poly it was copied from.

I calculated a specialQ range of 5M to 24M for Batalov's poly, using siever 13e.[/QUOTE]

I'll do it.

Dubslow 2012-04-12 02:50

[QUOTE=Batalov;296194]The speed will be what it will be (and on different nodes it will be different but proportional to their 'strength'). It is gauged by a small sieve with a command line like
[CODE]gnfs-lasieve4I13e -a t1.poly -f 9000000 -c 2000
gnfs-lasieve4I13e -a t2.poly -f 9000000 -c 2000
# and then repeat with different staggered -f ("from")[/CODE]

Murphy E is a rough estimation function, but a head-to-head run like above will help to decide (between a few top E-rated contenders; makes sense to bother with this only for gnfs>150, snfs>220, roughly, otherwise take the top poly by E)

For the third question, you may want to search forum and read. There are volumes written about this. Roughly, you want 46M non-redundant rels for a job with lpbr/a 29; 22M for lpbr/a 28; 92M for lpbr/a 30 - minimum; more is initially better, then becomes a waste (lost time for more sieving is not compensated by less time for the algebra).[/QUOTE]Ok, thanks, it's a good start. Now, the (really) stupid question: What's lpbr/lpba (and the other similar lines in the poly file)?
Edit: Is mfb* something to do with 'factor-base'? I've heard that term, but have only a small idea of how it applies to NFS... is mfb* always 2*lpb*?


(And is there a reference for how to you lasieve? There's no -h... I can guess that -a is the job file, -f is the starting q, and -c is how far to go?)

I just tried your poly (and your command), and got this:
total yield: 2905, q=9002003 (0.01983 sec/rel)
That would mean I could do the whole job (with four cores) in just over 1.5 days... but I don't really want to put all four cores on it. Maybe a C130 or 135? Oh well. [strike]RSALS![/strike]

Edit: Whoops, late to the party. That's what I get for going on a drink-run with suitemates halfway through writing a post :P

jrk 2012-04-12 03:07

[QUOTE=Batalov;296194]EDIT: musing about Jayson's correct message below (a primitive explanation) Norm makes this one faster, but less productive per the work range (due to alpha), so the range does need correction. Oh, wait, you shrunk it /I would have expected it to need be extended/. Anyway, Ben will adjust as needed.[/QUOTE]
What I did is sample a small number of specialQ roots in each 1M range of Q, and then multiply the number of relations found in each sample by the ratio of the number of specialQ roots in the range over the number of roots in its sample.

If the number of samples is large enough, this leads to a good estimate for the number of raw relations that will be found. This still doesn't tell us how many raw relations will be needed, since the duplication rate will depend on the number of specialQ sieved, but I took a guess that 29M raw relations would be more than adequate.

bsquared 2012-04-12 03:10

[QUOTE=jrk;296202]What I did is sample a small number of specialQ roots in each 1M range of Q, and then multiply the number of relations found in each sample by the ratio of the number of specialQ roots in the range over the number of roots in its sample.

If the number of samples is large enough, this leads to a good estimate for the number of raw relations that will be found. This still doesn't tell us how many raw relations will be needed, since the duplication rate will depend on the number of specialQ sieved, but I took a guess that 29M raw relations would be more than adequate.[/QUOTE]

Do you have a script that does that? If so I'd love to see it.

jrk 2012-04-12 03:22

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296201]Ok, thanks, it's a good start. Now, the (really) stupid question: What's lpbr/lpba (and the other similar lines in the poly file)?
Edit: Is mfb* something to do with 'factor-base'? I've heard that term, but have only a small idea of how it applies to NFS... is mfb* always 2*lpb*?[/QUOTE]
lpbr/a are the limits (in bits) on the size of large primes which will be allowed in the relation values. mfbr/a are the limits (in bits) on the size of (trial-factored) cofactors which will be split by MPQS after sieving.

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296201](And is there a reference for how to you lasieve? There's no -h... I can guess that -a is the job file, -f is the starting q, and -c is how far to go?)[/QUOTE]
-a is the flag to tell the siever to choose specialQ on the algebraic side of the relation. In some jobs you would use -r instead to sieve specialQ on the rational side.

bsquared 2012-04-12 03:29

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296201]Ok, thanks, it's a good start. Now, the (really) stupid question: What's lpbr/lpba (and the other similar lines in the poly file)?
Edit: Is mfb* something to do with 'factor-base'? I've heard that term, but have only a small idea of how it applies to NFS... is mfb* always 2*lpb*?


(And is there a reference for how to you lasieve? There's no -h... I can guess that -a is the job file, -f is the starting q, and -c is how far to go?)

I just tried your poly (and your command), and got this:
total yield: 2905, q=9002003 (0.01983 sec/rel)
That would mean I could do the whole job (with four cores) in just over 1.5 days... but I don't really want to put all four cores on it. Maybe a C130 or 135? Oh well. [strike]RSALS![/strike]

Edit: Whoops, late to the party. That's what I get for going on a drink-run with suitemates halfway through writing a post :P[/QUOTE]

If you've fetched the ggnfs SVN repository, then the file /src/lasieve4/INSTALL.and.USE may answer some of your questions. Then again, it may only create more ;)

In brief, lpbr/a specifies how big so called "large primes" are allowed to be for each relation. NFS factorization get almost all of their relations from combinations of relations with large primes. The bigger this value is, the more relations are needed to get the required number of combinations. This works the same as in QS, so google QS large prime variation or NFS large prime variation and you can learn more about it.

mfb/r specifies the maximum size composite that will be attempted to be split into large primes for each potential relation after sieving has removed all primes in the factor base.

But you should be doing more drink runs instead of reading this :)

Dubslow 2012-04-12 03:41

[QUOTE=bsquared;296210]If you've fetched the ggnfs SVN repository, then the file /src/lasieve4/INSTALL.and.USE may answer some of your questions. Then again, it may only create more ;)
[/quote]Nope, just asked somebody for links to lasieve.x so I could let yafu do all the hard work ;)
[QUOTE=bsquared;296210]
But you should be doing more drink runs instead of reading this :)[/QUOTE]
But I still got plenty of water!
[QUOTE=jrk;296207]lpbr/a are the limits (in bits) on the size of large primes which will be allowed in the relation values. mfbr/a are the limits (in bits) on the size of (trial-factored) cofactors which will be split by MPQS after sieving.
[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=bsquared;296210]
In brief, lpbr/a specifies how big so called "large primes" are allowed to be for each relation. NFS factorization get almost all of their relations from combinations of relations with large primes. The bigger this value is, the more relations are needed to get the required number of combinations. This works the same as in QS, so google QS large prime variation or NFS large prime variation and you can learn more about it.

mfb/r specifies the maximum size composite that will be attempted to be split into large primes for each potential relation after sieving has removed all primes in the factor base.
[/quote]Okay, what about *lim and *lambda? (Or Y0 and Y1? Are those some sort of intercepts?)

bsquared 2012-04-12 03:55

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296211]
Okay, what about *lim and *lambda? (Or Y0 and Y1? Are those some sort of intercepts?)[/QUOTE]

*lim are the factor base bounds on the rational and algebraic sides of the number field. *lambda is:

[QUOTE=INSTALL.and.USE]
# All sieve reports for which the sieve value is at least
# log(abs(polynomial value))-lambda*log(factor base bound)
# will be investigated by the trial division sieve.
[/QUOTE]

Y0/1 are the rational polynomial coefficients.

If none of that makes sense to you, I'd recommend you go read a bit about the basics of NFS and sieving (start with QS if you need to).

bsquared 2012-04-12 13:13

[QUOTE=Batalov;296194] EDIT: musing about Jayson's correct message below (a primitive explanation) Norm makes this one faster, but less productive per the work range (due to alpha), so the range does need correction. Oh, wait, you shrunk it /I would have expected it to need be extended/. Anyway, Ben will adjust as needed.

Good call B[sup]2[/sup]! Too small for RSALS and even if they did it, the job would be first in queue for a day.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, I didn't want to wait for or bother RSALS with this middling number. Sieving 5M-25M yielded 32M+ relations, which was plenty (24-25 was done with 14e on my workstation, since that's what yafu decided to use, the rest with 13e on the mini-cluster).

Msieve will be done with it in another hour and a half.

akruppa 2012-04-12 14:47

Here we go again.

bsquared 2012-04-12 14:50

i3010 =
[CODE]prp65 factor: 82059812711048446740392574427372605970429181518371714692723266939
prp75 factor: 202599559424682430613701324885437467831662447055045786149241488327937447909[/CODE]

Yep! Now on i3014. ECMing the C117...

bsquared 2012-04-12 15:18

I've started NFS, but anyone is welcome to beat me to a factor.

yoyo 2012-04-12 15:30

How many cores do I need to beat you ;)
yoyo

bsquared 2012-04-12 15:40

[QUOTE=yoyo;296246]How many cores do I need to beat you ;)
yoyo[/QUOTE]

That's the spirit!

I'm running on 6, but even with the head start you'd probably only need 8-12 cores or so :smile:.

bsquared 2012-04-12 18:48

Done, now on i3015. I'm stepping out for now.

akruppa 2012-04-12 21:01

Doing NFS on c111. Stopped, c111 got factored somehow.

Dubslow 2012-04-12 23:31

I guess somebody ECMd it. The C139 is gonna be a tough cookie.
[code]factoring 1264990137606389692444133450629384476462397574581510043754443286574402574630665344815194412858328992167908623915512930414751943767906189429
using pretesting plan: normal
using tune info for qs/gnfs crossover

div: primes less than 10000
fmt: 1000000 iterations
rho: x^2 + 3, starting 1000 iterations on C139
rho: x^2 + 2, starting 1000 iterations on C139
rho: x^2 + 1, starting 1000 iterations on C139
pm1: starting B1 = 150K, B2 = gmp-ecm default on C139
ecm: 30/30 curves on C139 input, at B1 = 2K, B2 = gmp-ecm default
ecm: 74/74 curves on C139 input, at B1 = 11K, B2 = gmp-ecm default
ecm: 214/214 curves on C139 input, at B1 = 50K, B2 = gmp-ecm default
pm1: starting B1 = 3750K, B2 = gmp-ecm default on C139
ecm: 430/430 curves on C139 input, at B1 = 250K, B2 = gmp-ecm default
pm1: starting B1 = 15M, B2 = gmp-ecm default on C139
ecm: 904/904 curves on C139 input, at B1 = 1M, B2 = gmp-ecm default
ecm: 54/2350 curves on C139 input, at B1 = 3M, B2 = gmp-ecm default[/code]
When it's done with the 3M I'll kill it, then we'll run standard ECM... and restart the cycle.

Batalov 2012-04-13 01:36

Better a c139 than a bad p139 :-)

Dubslow 2012-04-13 04:17

I called it quits at 1600@3M; started 1000@12M, and somebody should probably run at least a few hundred north of 40M. (And of course, a volunteer to start nfs.)

jrk 2012-04-13 06:00

Here's a poly:
[code][color=blue]# sieve with ggnfs lasieve4 I13e on alg side from Q=4M to 21.5M[/color]
# est ~29M raw relations (avg. 0.023 sec/rel C2D @ 3.4GHz)
# aq4788:3022
n: 1264990137606389692444133450629384476462397574581510043754443286574402574630665344815194412858328992167908623915512930414751943767906189429
# norm 2.791110e-13 alpha -6.993238 e 2.986e-11 rroots 3
skew: 250381.44
c0: -175454780246432276315295083860159
c1: 849411921289885239402429525
c2: 34199330229990184058525
c3: -87072389672945661
c4: -73902851374
c5: 667368
Y0: -285459427682843805320605998
Y1: 1143851721416731
rlim: 6000000
alim: 12000000
lpbr: 28
lpba: 28
mfbr: 56
mfba: 56
rlambda: 2.5
alambda: 2.5
[/code]

bsquared 2012-04-13 12:37

I can start the NFS tonight (12 hrs from now or so) if no-one else has volunteered by then, and if ECM is good.

akruppa 2012-04-13 13:18

In the process of running 2k@44M (Edit: done). I can't do NFS by myself, would take too long on my single home machine, but I can throw in a few relations if you like.

bsquared 2012-04-13 13:20

I'm doing 1k @ 44M, so by tonight we should be done with ECM.

I can take it solo - but thanks for the offer.

Dubslow 2012-04-13 23:23

I'm ~65 curves short of 2K@12M, so we're just a bit past t45.

bsquared 2012-04-14 14:43

i3027 @ c129

Dubslow 2012-04-14 15:03

Starting 1K@4m
Actually, better make that 2K
Anybody feel like going for ECM factorization only?

bsquared 2012-04-14 15:05

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296387]Starting 1K@4m
Actually, better make that 2K
Anybody feel like going for ECM factorization only?[/QUOTE]

I'd rather try a QS factorization than that :smile:

jrk 2012-04-14 16:56

One of my two ECM runs on line 3027 produced this gem:
[code]Run 153 out of 2000:
Using B1=10000000, B2=46842680440, polynomial Dickson(12), sigma=3536871957140198850
Step 1 took 27866ms
Step 2 took 15738ms
********** Factor found in step 2: 5551206901172054583062351210595874081775416652238749
Found probable prime factor of 52 digits: 5551206901172054583062351210595874081775416652238749
Probable prime cofactor 129906928311090953880459217864523818071838252366190167685116209056556687270679 has 78 digits

[/code]

edit: Group order is:

[code][2 5]

[3 1]

[17 1]

[269 1]

[9601 1]

[165479 1]

[669089 1]

[5137309 1]

[8592343 1]

[9612763 1]

[28033427731 1]

[/code]
Second largest factor is 96.13% of B1 and largest factor is 59.85% of B2.

bsquared 2012-04-14 17:00

Nice! I was halfway through poly select - will happily kill it.

akruppa 2012-04-14 22:33

Starting NFS on c121.

schickel 2012-04-15 02:23

[QUOTE=jrk;296397]One of my two ECM runs on line 3027 produced this gem:
[code]Run 153 out of 2000:
Using B1=10000000, B2=46842680440, polynomial Dickson(12), sigma=3536871957140198850
Step 1 took 27866ms
Step 2 took 15738ms
********** Factor found in step 2: 5551206901172054583062351210595874081775416652238749
Found probable prime factor of 52 digits: 5551206901172054583062351210595874081775416652238749
Probable prime cofactor 129906928311090953880459217864523818071838252366190167685116209056556687270679 has 78 digits[/code][/QUOTE]Wow, I never get that lucky on [I]my[/I] c130s!

[EDIT: It's also good to see that the downdriver is still alive (now, as long as the 5 doesn't add any digits); we're still golden....]

Andi47 2012-04-15 08:55

starting ECM @3e6 on alq4788.3033 c131

debrouxl 2012-04-15 09:02

600 @ B1=3e6 on the C131, NF.

mataje 2012-04-15 10:39

330 @ B1=3e6 on the C131, NF.

akruppa 2012-04-15 13:26

Found probable prime factor of 48 digits: 159450259206967402524996975215244611239608534557
Edit: starting NFS on c108

akruppa 2012-04-15 16:06

It got factored.

RichD 2012-04-15 21:18

i3041 has a C126 remaining .. and the 5 is gone!
(total size down to 137)

akruppa 2012-04-15 22:45

Did 2400@3M, now doing 2k@11M on c126.

rajula 2012-04-16 12:29

I threw 1500@3M on the c121@i3044. [SIZE="1"](I could do NFS, but I would not be able to read the factors before tomorrow morning, so I'll leave it to someone else.)[/SIZE]

RobertS 2012-04-16 17:27

[QUOTE=rajula;296500]I threw 1500@3M on the c121@i3044. [SIZE=1](I could do NFS, but I would not be able to read the factors before tomorrow morning, so I'll leave it to someone else.)[/SIZE][/QUOTE]
NFS:
PRP61 = 4261063551706376757731519359860876519277978869182669884472831
PRP60 = 541450378688037124823705235698592946874107589893049486011051

Now sieving c101@3045 ... done

firejuggler 2012-04-16 17:35

at this size, isn't it quicker to directly nfs?

RobertS 2012-04-16 17:39

[QUOTE=firejuggler;296532]at this size, isn't it quicker to directly nfs?[/QUOTE]
Sieving at this size is faster than nfs on my i7 @Win7 64bit

Dubslow 2012-04-16 19:33

Blergh... we picked up the 5 again. (C101 factored, now C122 i3046.)

akruppa 2012-04-16 20:22

Found probable prime factor of 43 digits: 3902175648266726783023329347656704128904277

Edit: oh crap

Dubslow 2012-04-16 20:29

[QUOTE=akruppa;296542]
Edit: oh crap[/QUOTE]
What an understatement... at least it's all by its lonesome self?

firejuggler 2012-04-16 21:21

The end... is near, friends, unless it pick a 3

jrk 2012-04-17 02:33

I did 2000 curves @ B1=4e6, B2=8561602150 on line 3048. NF

Dubslow 2012-04-17 02:49

I can do NFS, but it'd take about a day, maybe a bit less.

Edit: Starting NFS. If anyone intervenes in the next few hours, I can pass on the poly and job. (I could probably also pass on sieving, but at that point it's kinda pointless (damn you English words with 5000 meanings!).)

debrouxl 2012-04-17 09:27

The C120 at index 3049 is P36 (885347206161517046704356643418907199) * C84, found by GMP-ECM.
EDIT: and SIQS (yafu) produced another P36, 493951436092600008179009832136385333.

Dubslow 2012-04-17 20:11

C116 i3062 1K@2M, running 1K@11M then will start NFS.

akruppa 2012-04-17 20:17

I'm running NFS.

Dubslow 2012-04-17 23:52

We appear to have a 2^5*7 guide/driver/thingy, i3072; I'll start running 3-4M on C133 shortly.

Dubslow 2012-04-18 03:01

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296677]We appear to have a 2^5*7 guide/driver/thingy, i3072; I'll start running 3-4M on C133 shortly.[/QUOTE]
1000@3M; starting 1000@11M.

Batalov 2012-04-18 06:36

"Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action."

Dubslow 2012-04-18 06:58

[QUOTE=Batalov;296707]"Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action."[/QUOTE]

...:huh:?
:unsure:

Andi47 2012-04-18 07:00

I did ~300@3e6, no factor. Switching to 11e6.

schickel 2012-04-18 08:16

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296677]We appear to have a 2^5*7 guide/driver/thingy, i3072; I'll start running 3-4M on C133 shortly.[/QUOTE]Shoot....and it was going so well with just 2^3, in fact it even lost a couple more digits. Well, as long as we don't pick up a 3, the 2^5 * 7 should be pretty gentle, though it is an "up" guide.....

rajula 2012-04-18 11:40

1000@11M on the c133@i3072. Not knowing how much others have actually ran, I'll throw in another 400@43M. Presumably the number is about ready for NFS in any case.

akruppa 2012-04-18 12:33

4k@11M. Edit: can't do NFS on my home machine, would take a week or two.

Raman 2012-04-18 13:16

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296677]We appear to have a 2^5*7 guide/driver/thingy, i3072; I'll start running 3-4M on C133 shortly.[/QUOTE]

Once again, I will think that
following 2[sup]5[/sup]*7 thing is being rather quite easy to escape from

2[SUP]5[/SUP] always gives away the thing as follows
1+2+4+8+16+32 = 63, thus thereby retaining the 7 as such
but 7 gives away 1+7 = 8 = 2[sup]3[/sup]

But if the remaining cofactor factors into product of two primes of the form 1 (mod 4) / single prime of the form 3 (mod 8), then it will mutate, i.e. the power of 2 will increase beyond 5, there is good chance to lose the 7 within the subsequent iterations, if and only if
1. There is being no prime factor of the form 6 (mod 7)
2. Power of 2 is not being 2 (mod 3) at once
3. If the power of prime p is being k, then (p[sup]k+1[/sup]-1)/(p-1) is not being congruent to 0 (mod 7) at all

If an iteration factors as into 2[sup]5[/sup]*7*(prime of the form 1 mod 4), then within the subsequent iteration, the power of 2, will automatically come down to 4 itself (i.e. 2[sup]4[/sup]*7*...)

1+2+4+8+16+32 = 63 = 0 (mod 3), as long as the 2[sup]5[/sup]*7 thing is being on hold, it is not being possible to develop a 3, over on the subsequent iterations, either

This is not a 2[SUP]2[/SUP]*7 driver, whereby 1+2+4 = 7 preserves the 7 always; 1+7 = 8 = 2[sup]3[/sup] > 2[sup]2[/sup] thereby always retain the 2[sup]2[/sup] factor, as such as both.

Edit:-> Developed all the aliquot sequences being starting with the powers of 2 to, through 2[sup]300[/sup] throughout, and then, thereby thus storing out them within into the factoring database itself

Andi47 2012-04-18 13:50

1000@11e6, no factor.

jrk 2012-04-18 16:58

2250 curves @ B1=1e7, B2=46842680440 on line 3072. NF

Dubslow 2012-04-18 17:15

Holy cow, finished my 1K@11M; will move it to higher bounds, but this number is more than ready for NFS.

Batalov 2012-04-18 22:56

[QUOTE=Dubslow;296709]...:huh:?
:unsure:[/QUOTE]
Sorry, I was lamenting the great pith and moment of our beloved sequence that turned awry. Surely not the preceding post.
I turned to [URL="http://factordb.com/sequences.php?se=1&aq=516072&action=range&fr=1070&to=1080"]two[/URL] [URL="http://factordb.com/sequences.php?se=1&aq=345324&action=range&fr=1966&to=1976"]other[/URL] hungry mouths to feed. Most likely they, too, will turn awry; most of them do. Just a handful gets lucky.

Dubslow 2012-04-19 03:25

So wait, is anyone actually doing NFS, or are we just sitting around waiting for someone else to do it? (I would be willing to do it, but it'd take a few days.)

akruppa 2012-04-19 10:07

I for one am sitting around waiting for someone else to do it. I can sieve a bit, though, if that someone else gives me a poly and an sq-range.

bsquared 2012-04-19 13:14

I'll do it.

bsquared 2012-04-20 18:15

Now on i3075 with a C109... I'm doing NFS.

bsquared 2012-04-20 19:35

i3081 @ C104. I'm stepping aside for now - no more time to babysit this right now.

Oh, and now at 2^4 * 7

firejuggler 2012-04-20 19:36

don't you dare to drop 2 other 2.....

Dubslow 2012-04-20 20:13

I'll take the current C104, i3081


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