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-   Languages -- Ancient & Modern, Human & Machine (https://www.mersenneforum.org/forumdisplay.php?f=172)
-   -   Foreign words with a twist (https://www.mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=26395)

xilman 2021-02-02 10:43

[QUOTE=LaurV;570711]One only speaks English, the other one only speaks Spanish.
What's my prize? :razz:

Edit: if the one which speaks Spanish also likes Cola, will you call it "Torticollis"?[/QUOTE]Nope.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-02 13:18

[QUOTE=xilman;570667]Somewhat related, but only somewhat because the terms are not in common use, we have semi-adopted a couple of farm cats at our place in La Palma.

One has been called "Cake" and the other "Torte". The reason is left as an exercise for the reader.[/QUOTE]Because those are their names. :rolleyes:

xilman 2021-02-02 13:55

[QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570721]Because those are their names. :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]True by definition. There is a more interesting reason.

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-02 14:55

[QUOTE=xilman;570727][QUOTE=Dr Sardonicus;570721]Because those are their names. :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]True by definition. There is a more interesting reason.[/QUOTE]If you mean, why they were originally [i]given[/i] the names "cake" and "torte," I have no idea what the story is. Perhaps there is an amusing or interesting anecdote. But if you would rather make a guessing game of it than tell the story, oh, well...

Once upon a time, long long ago, a friend of the family had a cat she named Bubbles, after it tried to walk on top of her bubble bath.

A bit less long ago, my sister had neighbors who had named their cat Adolf. Adolf had a mostly white face, with a rectangular black patch that looked [i]just[/i] like a "toothbrush mustache." The name stuck, even after Adolf had a litter of kittens.

kruoli 2021-02-02 15:04

Solution: [SPOILER]"Torte" is the German word for "cake".[/SPOILER]

xilman 2021-02-02 16:29

[QUOTE=kruoli;570731]Solution[/QUOTE]Very close.

kruoli 2021-02-02 16:43

Then I guess it is about the "strict" meaning. [SPOILER]At least in our family, we use "Kuchen" as a broader term for "Torte", but strictly speaking, a Kuchen is never a Torte and vice versa. A Kuchen is a cake and a Torte is pie (I'm not sure about the English translation here).[/SPOILER]

ATH 2021-02-02 18:05

The word "slut" in danish and swedish means: end / ending / finish / exhausted

The word "pick" in swedish means: dick / cock (called "pik" in danish but pronounced the same)

The word "bag" in danish means: behind. Both in the sense of "behind something" but also as a nice slang word for ass like: bottom / behind

xilman 2021-02-02 18:11

[QUOTE=kruoli;570739]Then I guess it is about the "strict" meaning. [SPOILER]At least in our family, we use "Kuchen" as a broader term for "Torte", but strictly speaking, a Kuchen is never a Torte and vice versa. A Kuchen is a cake and a Torte is pie (I'm not sure about the English translation here).[/SPOILER][/QUOTE]He could well have been called Kuchen, but wasn't.

Is Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte a kind of pie? I didn't know that.

xilman 2021-02-02 18:16

[QUOTE=ATH;570747]The word "slut" in danish and swedish means: end / ending / finish / exhausted

The word "pick" in swedish means: dick / cock (called "pik" in danish but pronounced the same)

The word "bag" in danish means: behind. Both in the sense of "behind something" but also as a nice slang word for ass like: bottom / behind[/QUOTE]Right, if we are being salacious, I raise you the English terms C[SUB]4[/SUB]H[SUB]4[/SUB]AsH and 1- (2″-hydroxyl cyclohexyl)-3′-[aminopropyl]-4- [3′-aminopropyl]piperazine

Dr Sardonicus 2021-02-02 20:02

The only tortes I've had were cake. [i]Chocolate[/i] cake. The kind of thing that's so rich, you gain weight just by [i]looking[/i] at it, so you might as well eat it.

Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte. Huh. I've never had Kirsch or Kirschwasser, which is a kind of brandy distilled from a type of sour cherry. Hmm, rich chocolate cake infused with Kirsch. I've read that in the Schwarzwald there are tours which feature samples of the local products along the trail. I wonder how many tourists have to be carried out.

There was a puzzler on the radio ages ago which depended on the fact that "sachertorte" (an Austrian invention) is an anagram of "orchestrate."


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