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-   -   Just because it looks like it MIGHT be racism doesn't mean it is (https://www.mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=19138)

jasong 2014-02-11 09:50

Just because it looks like it MIGHT be racism doesn't mean it is
 
Maybe I'll get flamed for posting this, but this royally pisses me off. I know slavery was a horrible, horrible thing, and the 60s was a lousy time to be black. But, that doesn't mean every time something might be racist that it should be automatically assumed it is.

I suffer from something which is close to, but not quite, full facial blindless. Basically, I have a horrendous time telling similar people apart. If I meet someone out in public and they don't give me a hint, there's a good chance I'll have no idea who they are. People get offended by this, but honestly, I'm simply, and I mean this literally, retarded when it comes to recognizing people.

I've been this way all my life, but recently there's been some stuff I've been seeing online where black people get a wild hair up their butt because of something that only appears to be racism. I'm sure Samuel Jackson has made some great movies, but after you correct the mistaken identity error committed by the white dude, move the fuck on. He abused the guy for a really long time, I didn't even watch the whole video.

Racism is bad, I get it, but reversing the direction it's aimed doesn't solve anything. Pretty soon you're going to be getting backlash to the backlash. So, for the sake of racial relations, shut the fuck up and accept that sometimes people will say and do stupid stuff.

Brian-E 2014-02-11 10:59

What you write is pretty self-evident, I think. Errors of this sort do not by any means always have anything to do with any racism.

[YOUTUBE]ToaHQI9X5RI[/YOUTUBE]

I've just watched the video myself. What strikes me is how well Samuel L. Jackson handled this crass blunder by his interviewer. He certainly doesn't let it go lightly, but then it isn't really something to be taken lightly, is it? Mistaken identity in this setting is extremely unusual, bizarre actually. Yet Jackson handles it with good humour, giving his extraordinarily ill-prepared interviewer some useful advice. If I had been Jackson I think I might have just removed my microphone and walked off.

jasong 2014-02-12 04:29

[QUOTE=Brian-E;366648]What you write is pretty self-evident, I think. Errors of this sort do not by any means always have anything to do with any racism.

[YOUTUBE]ToaHQI9X5RI[/YOUTUBE]

I've just watched the video myself. What strikes me is how well Samuel L. Jackson handled this crass blunder by his interviewer. He certainly doesn't let it go lightly, but then it isn't really something to be taken lightly, is it? Mistaken identity in this setting is extremely unusual, bizarre actually. Yet Jackson handles it with good humour, giving his extraordinarily ill-prepared interviewer some useful advice. If I had been Jackson I think I might have just removed my microphone and walked off.[/QUOTE]
Yeah, I saw a picture of the other actor a few minutes ago, and the other guy is a lot lighter brown, so my facial recognition problem wouldn't have caused this particular mistake.

Looking back, I think it's more about me being unhappy about how people in the black community treat me when I mistake them for someone else.

TheMawn 2014-02-12 04:37

Even Oprah Winfrey is quick to call racism.

It's such an easy card to pull to get preferential treatment. We have to treat black people better than white people because black people can call racism on an honest mistake whereas white people are just frustrated by the slight mistreatment.

Of course where I live, it's First Nations, not black people. And in the same way as not all black people are trying to leverage the 1950's, not all First Nations people are trying to leverage the 1650's. But it sure frickin' looks like it.

LaurV 2014-02-12 05:59

This all discussion reminds me of the movie Rush Hours, when the [U]Chinese[/U] guy went to the [U]white[/U] bartender and asked him "what's up my niga?" "what did you say?" and he innocently repeated "what's up... my... niga ?!"

Brilliant, I was laughing for a week when I saw the movie. I still don't understand why people would give a dime about what color of the skin other people have. I am white, just to clarify. In my country, women with (beautiful) white skin spend fortunes to go to the beach and get tanned dark skin. Since I am in Thai, I saw Thai women with (beautiful) dark skin spending fortunes on whitening lotions (freaking big industry here, full of charlatans too) to get lighter skin.

Insane :loco:

Brian-E 2014-02-12 10:34

[QUOTE=TheMawn;366714]It's such an easy card to pull to get preferential treatment. We have to treat black people better than white people because black people can call racism on an honest mistake whereas white people are just frustrated by the slight mistreatment.[/QUOTE]
I think you may be hinting at an important discussion point, and it's one that interests me, but I can't quite get a handle on exactly what you are saying here. What "preferential treatment" are you talking about? Can you give one or two concrete examples?

c10ck3r 2014-02-12 14:15

Man I'm glad I'm not in the interviewer's position...
I can recognize maybe four actors by name based on looks, most are simply "The guy/gal from ___". It seems that an entertainment reporter, however, should do at least some light background research on people he'll be interviewing to find out the recent happenings in their lives/careers...


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